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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 19 Nov 2011 20:17 
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Un interesante ejemplo de ópera de decimonónica de ese país que los alemanes consideraban "el país sin música". :D

Zelenka, aunque ya han pasado algunas semanas desde que hablaste de Philidor (mucho más conocido entre los ambientes ajedrecistas que entre los musicales), quería preguntarte si una obra suya titulada "La boda de la gorda Cathos" es una ópera. He buscado un poco pero no he encontrado nada al respecto, y con un título tan curioso me gustaría saberlo.


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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 19 Nov 2011 21:04 
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La obra que mencionas, Le Mariage de la Grosse Cathos, no es de François-André Danican dit Philidor, sino de su padre André Danican Philidor dit l’aîné.

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Se trata de una mascarade estrenada en 1688 en Versalles.


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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 19 Nov 2011 21:31 
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¡Gracias! :reverencia:


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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 19 Nov 2011 21:45 
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De nada. :wink:


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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 27 Nov 2011 22:45 
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August Emil Enna (1859–1939) He was born in Nakskow, Denmark. He was the son of a shoemaker, of Italian descent, who took his family from Nakskov to Copenhagen in 1870. At the age of 18, after working at a variety of jobs (including shoe-making), he began to learn the violin and the piano in earnest. As early as 1880 he appeared as a music director in dramatic performances, for some of which he also composed the music. He then studied with Christian Schiørring (violin) and the organist Peter Rasmussen (theory). Subsequently he became a member of the town orchestra in Björneborg (now Pori), Finland. In 1883 he returned to Denmark to become music director of Werner’s Theatrical Society, a provincial touring company. By 1884 he had composed his first opera, Agleia, some piano music and other instrumental works, and by 1886 a Symphony (in C minor) which aroused Gade’s interest. With support from Gade he was awarded the Anckerske Legat, which enabled him to work in Flensburg (1888-9) on what became one of his best-known operatic works, Heksen. This was produced in 1892, and subsequently performed abroad. With the production of Kleopatra in 1894, Enna’s reputation as an operatic composer was firmly established. He continued to produce a steady stream of operas, as well as operettas, incidental music and a quantity of other instrumental and vocal music. He periodically appeared as a conductor in the theatre but was essentially a self-employed, self-taught composer. While his music is not especially profound, it derives inspiration from Wagner and Verdi, as well as from the Danish Romantic tradition. His sensitivity to theatrical nuance, his effective orchestration and his easy melodic gift earned him considerable success. He was granted the title of professor in 1908.

Óperas

Den lille pige med svovlstikkerne (1897) Cuento de hadas en un acto. Fragmento.

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Heiße Liebe (1903) Ópera en dos actos. Fragmento del acto segundo.

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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 03 Dic 2011 12:48 
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Johann Baptist Henneberg (1768-1822). He was born in Vienna. He succeeded his father as organist at the Schottenstift in Vienna, and by 1790 had joined Schikaneder’s company at the Freihaus-Theater (later the Theater an der Wien) as Kapellmeister and composer. He supervised rehearsals of Die Zauberflöte during Mozart’s absence in Prague and conducted the opera from the third performance. From 1797 he had an able co-director in Seyfried. Apart from his own works, he arranged the piano scores of the Süssmayr-Schikaneder Der Spiegel von Arkadien (1794), the Winter and Mederitsch-Schikaneder Babylons Pyramiden (1797) and the Winter-Schikaneder Das Labyrinth (1798). In 1804, owing to his wife’s illness, he left Vienna and settled near the Hungarian border; he became organist to the Esterházys at Eisenstadt and in 1811 succeeded Hummel as Kapellmeister. Following his wife’s death in 1814 he returned to Vienna and became choirmaster at the Kirche Am Hof and, from August 1818, court organist. His most successful score was his setting of Schikaneder’s Die Waldmänner, a comic opera given nearly a hundred times in the Freihaus-Theater auf der Wieden after its première in October 1793. For the Theater an der Wien he wrote no new operas and resigned as Kapellmeister in 1802. He had the reputation of being a fine organist and a good, careful conducto. His death was brought about by a neglected thigh wound incurred while checking a repair to the court organ. Apart from his several stage works (chiefly Singspiele) he also wrote sacred and secular vocal compositions (a set of Notturni was published in 1802), dance music, other orchestral pieces and wind music.

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Franz Xaver Gerl (1764-1827) Bass and compose, he was born in Andorf, Upper Austria. r. The son of a village schoolmaster and organist, Gerl by 1777 was an alto chorister at Salzburg, where he must have been a pupil of Leopold Mozart. He was at the Salzburg Gymnasium from 1778 until 1782 and he then went on to study logic and physics at the university. In the autumn of 1785 he went to Erlangen as a bass, joining the theatrical company of Ludwig Schmidt, who had been at Salzburg earlier that year. In the autumn of 1786 he joined G.F.W. Grossmann´s company, performing in the Rhineland, and specialized in ‘comic roles in comedies and Singspiele’. By 1787 he was a member of Schikaneder´s company at Regensburg, making his début in Sarti’s Wenn zwei sich streiten (Fra i due litiganti) and appearing as Osmin in Die Entführung. From the summer of 1789 Gerl was a member of Schikaneder´s company at the Freihaus-Theater auf der Wieden, Vienna. In 1789 he married the soprano Barbara Reisinger. His name first appears as one of the composers of Der dumme Gärtner aus dem Gebirge , Schikaneder´s first new production at his new theatre, in 1789; it is unlikely that this was Gerl´s first theatre score, since Schikaneder would hardly have entrusted such an important task to someone without experience. Der dumme Gärtner proved so successful that it had no fewer than five sequels; Gerl certainly performed in two of these, though it is uncertain whether he and Schack wrote the scores for all of them. Between 1789 and 1793 Gerl wrote music for several more plays and Singspiele, and even after he left the company one or two further scores by him were heard there.

Gerl played a wide variety of parts in plays and operas (including Don Giovanni and Figaro in German) during his Vienna years, though he is most often associated with the role of Sarastro in Die Zauberflöte, which he created on September 1791 and continued to sing at least until November 1792 (the 83rd performance, announced by Schikaneder as the 100th). The Gerls appear to have left the Freihaus-Theater in 1793; they were at Brünn (Brno) from 1794 until 1801, and from the beginning of 1802 Gerl was a member (with good salary and reasonable pension arrangements) of the Mannheim Nationaltheater. Apart from operatic roles he also appeared frequently in plays (including at least five Schiller parts). After his wife´s death in 1806 he continued to appear at the Mannheim theatre until his retirement in 1826; on 12 April that year he remarried. His second wife was Magdalena Dengler (née Reisinger - his first wife´s elder sister), the widow of Georg Dengler, director of the Mainz theatre.

Although the paucity of the surviving material and the difficulty of identifying Gerl´s contribution to joint scores make it impossible to evaluate him as a composer, the works he wrote were popular in their day. His career as a singer is better documented. When Schröder, the greatest actor-manager of his age, went to Vienna in 1791 he was told not to miss hearing Schack and Gerl at Schikaneder´s theatre. At the end of May he heard Wranitzky´s Oberon, in which both were singing. Schröder thought Gerl´s singing of the Oracle ‘very good’; and Mozart´s high regard for his qualities is evident in the aria ‘Per questa bella mano’ (k612), written for Gerl in March 1791, and above all in Sarastro´s music. It was on the song ‘Ein Weib ist das herrlichste Ding’ from the first Anton sequel (music by Schack and/or Gerl) that Mozart wrote the piano variations k613. Mozart´s friendly relationship with Gerl is attested by the fact that Gerl was one of the three singers who is said, on the last afternoon of Mozart´s life, to have joined the dying composer in an impromptu sing-through of the Requiem (the others were Schack and Mozart´s brother-in-law Franz Hofer).

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Benedikt (Emanuel) Schack [Cziak, Schak, Žák, Ziak] (1758-1826). Austrian tenor, composer and flautist of Bohemian origin, he was born in Mirotice. He acquired a basic musical and general education from his father, a school teacher, and later studied at Staré Sedlo, Svatá Hora and (from 1773) Prague, where he was a chorister at the cathedral. From 1775 he studied medicine, philosophy and singing (with Karl Frieberth) in Vienna; while a student he wrote some Singspiele and oratorios. In 1780 he was appointed Kapellmeister to Prince Heinrich von Schönaich-Carolath in Silesia. After two years of irregular employment, mostly in Bohemia, he joined Schikaneder’s travelling theatre company in 1786. The company toured extensively in southern Germany and Austria before settling in Vienna in 1789, where Schack became the principal tenor at the Freihaus-Theater auf der Wieden (1789). His fame as a composer was based on the series of Schikaneder’s seven ‘Anton’ Singspiele, mostly written in collaboration with F.X. Gerl. He was a close friend of Mozart, who composed (or assisted with) certain numbers for Schack’s theatrical scores (notably the duet ‘Nun liebes Weibchen’ k625/592a for Der Stein der Weisen). Mozart also wrote piano variations (k613) on Schack’s air ‘Ein Weib ist das herrlichste Ding auf der Welt’ from Die verdeckten Sachen. Schack performed a wide variety of roles: the part of Tamino was written for him (it is to be presumed that he also played Tamino’s flute solos), and he was the first German-language Don Gonsalvo (Don Ottavio) and Count Almaviva (Vienna, 1792); he also took the soprano part in an impromptu sing-through of the unfinished Requiem at the composer’s bedside on the eve of Mozart’s death. His wife Elisabeth (née Weinhold) sang the part of the Third Lady in the première of Die Zauberflöte.

In 1793 Schack moved to Graz and in 1796 to Munich, where he was a member of the Hoftheater until about 1813, when he lost his voice and was pensioned. His daughter Antonie (1784-1851) was also a member of the Munich company (1800-06). During his last years he wrote mostly sacred music, including a mass. He died before receiving Constanze Nissen’s letter (February 1826) asking for help with her husband’s biography of Mozart; the letter gives an eloquent if politely exaggerated testimony to the friendship of Schack and Mozart: ‘I could think of absolutely no one who knew him better or to whom he was more devoted than you … Of great and general interest will be what you can instance of Mozart’s few compositions in your operas’. F.L. Schröder commented (May 1791) on Schack as a singer in Wranitzky’s Oberon: ‘Hüon, Schack, a good [braver] tenor, but with an Austrian accent and suburban declamation’. Leopold Mozart was more appreciative in a letter to his daughter (May 1786): ‘He sings excellently, has a beautiful voice, easy and flexible throat, and beautiful method … This man sings really very beautifully’.

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Emanuel (Johann Joseph [Baptist]) Schikaneder (1751-1812). Dramatist, theatre director, actor, singer and composer, he was born in Straubing, Lower Bavaria. Educated at the Jesuit Gymnasium at Regensburg, where he was a cathedral chorister, Schikaneder may briefly have been a town musician before he became an actor with F.J. Moser’s troupe in 1773 or 1774. In 1774 he danced in a court ballet at Innsbruck, where his Singspiel Die Lyranten (of which he wrote both words and music) was performed in 1775 or 1776. The Innsbruck company, then under Andreas Schopf and Theresia Schimann, moved in 1776 to Augsburg, where in 1777 he married Maria Magdalena (known as Eleonore) Arth an actress in the company. In 1777-8 they were in Nuremberg with Moser’s company, and in December 1777 Schikaneder made a famous guest appearance as Hamlet at the Munich court theatre, where he was obliged to repeat the final scene as an encore. From January 1778 he was director of the troupe, appearing at Ulm, Stuttgart, Augsburg, Nuremberg, Rothenburg and elsewhere. In 1780 they went to Laibach (now Ljubljana), Klagenfurt and Linz before beginning a lengthy season at Salzburg in September, during which Schikaneder became friendly with the Mozarts. Further travels through Austria included summer seasons at Graz in 1781 and 1782, the winter of 1782-3 in Pressburg (now Bratislava), and a guest appearance in summer 1783 at the Kärntnertortheater, Vienna.

After further visits to Pest and Pressburg, where Joseph II saw him perform in October 1784, Schikaneder was invited to play in Vienna. He and Hubert Kumpf began a three-month season of operas and Singspiele at the Kärntnertor in November. Thereafter, Schikaneder was a member of the Nationaltheater, performing in plays and operas, from 1785 until 1786. During this time his own troupe was run by his wife and Johann Friedel, touring in southern Austria until it moved into the Freihaus-Theater auf der Wieden, Vienna, in November 1788. Schikaneder himself, in February 1786, had been granted an imperial licence for the building of a suburban theatre but did not make use of it for 15 years, forming instead a new company specializing in Singspiele and operas, which he took to Salzburg, Augsburg and Memmingen. In February 1787 he took over the Prince of Thurn and Taxis’s court theatre at Regensburg. When Johann Friedel died at the end of March 1789, Schikaneder and his wife took over the Freihaus-Theater, bringing from Regensburg the singer-composers Schack and Gerl. Schikaneder’s reign at the Freihaus began on July 1789 with the first performance of his ‘Anton’ opera Der dumme Gärtner, and from this time dates the beginning of his steady series of plays, opera and Singspiel librettos which were the backbone of the repertory of his theatre (but which were also performed in other theatres, sometimes with new musical scores).

Schikaneder’s years of travel had seen the production of more straight plays than operas; in Vienna he placed the emphasis firmly on opera, and commissioned settings of his own texts from Mozart (Die Zauberflöte), Süssmayr (Der Spiegel von Arkadien), Wölfl (Der Höllenberg), Mederitsch and Winter (one act each of Babylons Pyramiden; Winter also set Das Labyrinth, a sequel to Die Zauberflöte). He also received scores from his theatre Kapellmeister, Henneberg (Die Waldmänner), Haibel (Der Tiroler Wastel) and Seyfried (Der Löwenbrunn and Der Wundermann am Rheinfall). As the 1790s advanced, Schikaneder began to suffer from increasing financial difficulties as he strove to surpass the achievements of his rivals and of his own greatest successes. Some of Schikaneder’s comedies (the ‘Anton’ plays, Der Tiroler Wastel, Das abgebrannte Haus, Der Fleischhauer von Ödenburg, Die Fiaker in Wien) continued to be much performed for many years and strongly influenced the later development of the Viennese Lokalstück. Early in his career Schikaneder composed two, and perhaps several more, theatre scores: it has long been known that the music as well as the text of Die Lyranten was his work; and for the production of his Singspiel Das Urianische Schloss (1786, Salzburg) at the Theater in der Leopoldstadt in November 1787, a score by him is specifically mentioned by Wenzel Müller in his diary.

Operas

Der wohltätige Derwisch, oder Die Schellenkappe (1793) Singspiel en tres actos. Del acto segundo, Die Männer zu fesseln, del acto tercero, Ihr Undankbaren lebet wohl.

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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 10 Dic 2011 19:58 
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Risto Savin (1858-1948) He was born in Žalec a town in central Slovenia. The family of Risto Savin or Friderik Širca, as he was born, originally comes from Notranjska region; his ancestors settled in Žalec in 1816. Friderik grew up in a numerous family, which apart form his parents comprised two sisters and three brothers. While none of them displayed any particularly talent for music, Friderik was already composing as young man. A high-ranking Austrian army officer by profession, an important milestone for Savin´s perception of music arrived in 1886 when he was stationed in Sarajevo. It was then that he decided to adopt a more ambitious attitude towards music and began to increasingly preform in public, either as singer or accompanist on the piano. He studied composition privately in Vienna (1892-6) and Prague (1897-9). Another significant outcome of his stay in Bosnia and Herzegovina was his coming in touch with the Slavic folk music of the southern Balkans. In the years and decades that followed, Savin went on to write dozens of musical works, which increasingly reflect his individual artistic expression rooted in the European neo-romanticism. While it was he who first introduced the particular style (augmented with certain characteristics of Slavic music) in Slovenia, Savin is generally regarded as one of the most prominent representatives of Slovenian modernism at the end of 19th and the first decades of the 20th century.

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Lepa Vida (1907) Ópera en cuatro actos. Comienzo.

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Última edición por Zelenka el 25 Ene 2012 22:55, editado 1 vez en total

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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 17 Dic 2011 12:01 
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Sadao Bekku (*1922) He was born in Tokyo. He studied physics (graduating in 1946) and aesthetics (1946-50) at Tokyo University, taking private lessons in composition with Ikenouchi from 1944. In 1946, 1947 and 1948 he won prizes in the Mainichi Music Competition, and in 1949, the year he joined the Shinsei Kai, he was awarded the Mainichi Prize. From 1951 to 1954 he was in Paris, where he studied at the Conservatoire with Milhaud, Messiaen and Rivier. He won both the Mainichi and the Otaka Prizes in 1957 with his Two Prayers for orchestra. He taught composition at the Toho Gakuen School of Music (1955-73) and at Chuo University (1973-93), while serving as the chairman of the Japanese branch of the ISCM (1963-79). As a composer he represents a Japanese branch of French neo-classicism, influenced by Messiaen and Rivier.

Óperas

Arima-no Miko (1963-67) Ópera en tres actos (seis escenas). Escena primera del acto tercero.

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Última edición por Zelenka el 25 Ene 2012 22:56, editado 1 vez en total

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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 26 Dic 2011 11:51 
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Ruggero Leoncavallo (1857-1919) The son of a police magistrate, Leoncavallo was born in Naples. As child he moved with his father in the town of Montalto Uffugo in Calabria where Leoncavallo lived during his adolescence. He later returned to Naples and was educated at the city's San Pietro a Majella Conservatory. After some years spent teaching and in ineffective attempts to obtain the production of more than one opera, he saw the enormous success of Pietro Mascagni's Cavalleria rusticana in 1890, and he wasted no time in producing his own verismo hit, Pagliacci. (According to Leoncavallo, the plot of this work had a real-life origin: he claimed it derived from a murder trial, in Montalto Uffugo, over which his father had presided.) Pagliacci was performed in Milan in 1892 with immediate success; today it is the only work by Leoncavallo in the standard operatic repertory. Its most famous aria "Vesti la giubba" was recorded by Enrico Caruso and laid claim to being the world's first record to sell a million copies (although this is probably a total of Caruso's various versions of it made in 1902, 1904 and 1907).

The next year his I Medici was also produced in Milan, but neither it nor Chatterton (belatedly produced in 1896)—both early works—obtained much lasting favour. It was not until Leoncavallo's La bohème was performed in 1897 in Venice that his talent obtained public confirmation. However, it was outshone by Puccini's opera of the same name and on the same subject, which was premiered in 1896. Two tenor arias from Leoncavallo's version are still occasionally performed, especially in Italy. Subsequent operas by Leoncavallo were 1900's Zazà and 1904's Der Roland von Berlin. He had a brief success with Gli zingari which premiered in Italian in London in 1912, with a long run at the Hippodrome Theatre. Gli zingari also reached the United States but soon disappeared from the repertoire.

After a series of operettas, Leoncavallo tried for one last serious effort, Edipo Re, but he died before he could finish the orchestration, which was completed by Giovanni Pennacchio. In Edipo Re (a short one act work) the composer uses exactly the same melody for the final scene Miei poveri fior, per voi non più sole... (with the blinded Edipo) as he had for the Act IV Soprano aria from Der Roland von Berlin. It has been assumed (see The New Grove Dictionary of Opera) that Leoncavallo left the opera more or less complete (except for the orchestration), but Pennacchio may have had to do more and may have 'filled in the gaps' using Leoncavallo's earlier music. Unusually, Leoncavallo did not write the libretto. The libretto for Edipo Re was written by Giovacchino Forzano, who also wrote Il piccolo Marat for Pietro Mascagni and two of the one-act operas for Puccini's Il trittico.

Leoncavallo also composed songs, most famously Mattinata, which he wrote for the Gramophone Company (which became HMV) with Caruso's unique voice in mind. On 8 April 1904, Leoncavallo accompanied Caruso at the piano as they recorded the song. On December 8, 1905 he recorded five of his own pieces for the reproducing piano Welte-Mignon. Leoncavallo was the librettist for most of his own operas. Many considered him the greatest Italian librettist of his time after Boito. Among Leoncavallo's libretti for other composers is his contribution to the libretto for Puccini's Manon Lescaut. Ruggero Leoncavallo died in Montecatini Terme, Tuscany.


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La bohème (1897) Ópera en cuatro actos. Comienzo.

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Última edición por Zelenka el 25 Ene 2012 22:57, editado 1 vez en total

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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 01 Ene 2012 16:40 
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Marcos António da Fonseca Portugal (1762–1830) He was born in Lisbon. He first studied music at the Patriarchal Seminary in Lisbon where, as a 14 year old student, he wrote his first work, a Miserere. He later worked as composer and organist at the Patriarchal See, and was maestro at the Theatre of Salitre in Lisbon. He lived in Italy from late 1792 to 1800, possibly funded by the Prince Regent, D. João. He wrote 21 operas for various Italian theatres, the first being I due gobbi, premièred in Florence in the spring of 1793. His version of The Marriage of Figaro premièred in Venice in 1799. Marcos Portugal returned to his home country in 1800. The huge success that his opere buffe had earned him assure him a still unsurpassed international fame in Portugal's music history. He became maestro at the Teatro Nacional de São Carlos in Lisbon, and was appointed music master at the Patriarchal Seminary in Lisbon.

He continued to write operas, mainly opere serie, and a large number of religious works, until moving to Brazil in 1811, from where the Prince Regent had called him. Upon arriving, Marcos Portugal was appointed music master to the sons and daughters of the Prince Regent, and became the official Royal Composer. He wrote mainly religious music until at least 1824, date of his last known surviving autograph. In Portugal and Brazil, his reputation rests mainly on his religious music output, a genre cultivated throughout his composing life. He remained in Rio de Janeiro when the Portuguese Court returned to Portugal, in 1821, continuing to serve his pupil, the First Emperor of Brazil, D. Pedro, as he had previously served his father, king John VI of Portugal. He died in Rio de Janeiro.

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Le Donne Cambiate (1797) Farsa en un acto. Dueto.

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Última edición por Zelenka el 05 Feb 2012 14:25, editado 2 veces en total

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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 14 Ene 2012 17:07 
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Marjan Kozina (1907-1966) He was born in Novo mesto, Slovenia. He studied mathematics at Ljubljana University and music at the conservatory (1925-7), later continuing his compositional studies with Joseph Marx at the Vienna Music Academy (1927-30) and with Suk in the Prague Conservatory masterclasses (1930-32), where he was also a conducting pupil of Malko. On his return to Yugoslavia he worked successively as répétiteur at the Ljubljana and Zagreb operas (1932-4), conductor of the Maribor Glasbena Matica and director of its music school (1934-9), teacher at the Belgrade Music Academy (1939-43, 1945-7), director of the Slovenian Philharmonic (1948-50) and composition teacher at the Ljubljana Academy of Music (1951-60). He composed in a neo-Romantic, naturalistic style, incorporating pictorialism and elements of folksong. He was a member of the Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts.

Óperas

Ekvinokcij (1946) Ópera en cuatro actos. Comienzo del acto cuarto.

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1927-30


Última edición por Zelenka el 25 Ene 2012 22:59, editado 1 vez en total

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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 21 Ene 2012 18:45 
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Ciprian Porumbescu, born Cyprian Gołęmbiowski (1853-1883) He was born in Şipotele Sucevei in Bukovina (now Shepit, Putyla Raion, Ukraine). Ciprian Porumbescu was born into the family of Iraclie Porumbescu, an ethnic Romanian writer and Orthodox priest of possible Polish origins. He studied music in Suceava and Cernăuţi, then continued at the Konservatorium für Musik und darstellende Kunst in Vienna from 1879 to 1881 under Anton Bruckner and Franz Krenn. His artistic career as a composer, conductor, violinist, and pianist started in Cernăuţi, and continued in Vienna, and later in Braşov where he taught vocal music at Romanian schools.

Porumbescu wrote poetry, lyrics and press articles, and actively participated in the public cultural life. He helped the rise of the Romanian music school during an age of enthusiasm generated by Romania's independence. Some of the most remarkable musical pages of the composer were inspired by national heroes and great army leaders, such as Stephen III of Moldavia and Dragoş Vodă. The appreciation of his music came from the melodic nature of his compositions and their folklore inspiration.

Porumbescu left a legacy of more than 250 works, bringing him fame and popularity through his short life. The composer saw his work Crai Nou (New Moon) performed in Braşov, while his vocal works Pe-al nostru steag (On our flag), Tricolorul (Three coloured), Cântec de primăvară (Spring song), Serenada, Cântecul gintei latine (Latin nation song), La malurile Prutului (On the Prut's shores), and Altarul manastirii Putna (Putna monastery's altar) were already in the public conscience. He died at the age of 29 in Stupca, which was renamed Ciprian Porumbescu in his honor.

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Crai Nou (1882) Opereta en dos actos. Fragmento.

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Última edición por Zelenka el 29 Mar 2014 21:28, editado 1 vez en total

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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 29 Ene 2012 11:30 
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Umberto Menotti Maria Giordano (1867-1948) Nació en Foggia, Italia, y a pesar de la oposición de su padre se matriculó en el Conservatorio de Nápoles en 1882. Fue alumno de Paolo Serrao y escribió su primera ópera, Marina para un concurso académico. Posteriormente escribió Mala Vita, una valiente obra verista acerca de un hombre que promete reformar a una prostituta si él se cura de una tuberculosis. Esta obra causó cierto escándalo durante su representación en Roma en 1892, alcanzando más popularidad en Austria y Alemania. Giordano intentó un acercamiento más romántico con su siguiente ópera Regina Diaz (1894), pero ésta fue un fracaso, retirándose después de dos representaciones. Giordano entonces probó suerte en Milán, de nuevo con un tema verista, con su trabajo más conocido, Andrea Chénier (1896), con un libreto de Luigi Illica basado en la vida del poeta francés André Chénier. Fedora (1898) fue también un éxito, y es representada en la actualidad. Su trabajo posterior es menos conocido, aunque ocasionalmente representado. El teatro más importante de Foggia está dedicado a Umberto Giordano. También existe en Foggia una plaza en su honor, en el que varias estatuas recuerdan sus obras más famosas.

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Madame Sans-Gêne (1915) Ópera en tres actos. Se ce n'e! Ma piu spesso la terra era il giaciglio, per i nostri riposi! y La Duchessa di Danzica, ambas del acto segundo.

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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
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Sebastián Durón (1660-1716) Nació en Brihuega, Guadalajara, España. Recibió las enseñanzas de su hermano Diego Durón, también compositor. Sebastián ejerció como organista o maestro de capilla en distintas catedrales (Sevilla, Cuenca, El Burgo de Osma, Catedral de Palencia) hasta que en 1691 es nombrado maestro de la Real Capilla del Rey Carlos II en Madrid. Mantendrá este puesto hasta 1706, cuando fue suspendido a causa del apoyo expreso del músico al archiduque Carlos de Austria durante la guerra de sucesión española, que terminó con la victoria del candidato borbónico, el Rey Felipe V. Durón debió exiliarse en Francia, de donde regresó efímeramente en 1714 para ejercer de músico en importantes casas nobiliarias, como la de los duques de Osuna. En 1715 retornó definitivamente a Francia para ejercer en Bayona de capellán de la reina exiliada Mariana de Neoburgo, viuda de Carlos II. Murió enfermo de tuberculosis.

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Salir el amor del mundo (1696) Zarzuela en 2 actos. Sosieguen descansen.

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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
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Lodovico Rocca (1895-1986). He was born in Turin. He studied in Turin and with Giacomo Orefice in Milan, and was director of the Turin Conservatory, 1940-66. His fame rests on his third opera, Il Dibuk, in relation to which most of his other works may be regarded as preparations, by-products or postscripts. The first two operas are most interesting where they foreshadow Il Dibuk most strongly; the fourth, Monte Ivnor, uses an idiom very similar to that of its predecessor, but is less compelling and sometimes self-imitative. More drastic creative decline is evident in L'uragano and in other works completed after the war though the Antiche iscrizioni still show individuality. Il Dibuk is a difficult work to assess: while the libretto is unusually striking, the music itself often seems more an eclectic amalgam than a unified whole. The sombre modality of the choral writing, tinged with oriental inflections reminiscent of Bloch, gives way in more dramatic episodes to a highly dissonant language, with abrupt outcrops of parallel seconds, while the final duet reverts to a more traditional, sentimental Italian manner. Nonetheless the total effect in the theatre proved powerful enough, when the work was new, to win it one of the biggest Italian operatic successes since Puccini's Turandot. Of Rocca's non-theatrical works, the early songs already point the way to Il Dibuk, and the Interludio epico, composed when the opera was in progress, is particularly close to it in style. In the Proverbi di Salomone, Salmodia, the Schizzi francescani and the relatively light Storiella, Rocca's taste for freakish instrumentation is carried to startling extremes. At their best these pieces recapture something of Il Dibuk's poetry, but in their weaker moments they show that the devices deployed so tellingly in the opera can too easily degenerate into mannerisms.

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Monte Ivnor (1936-8) ópera en tres actos. Fragmento del acto segundo.

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