Fecha actual 21 Sep 2019 1:17

Todos los horarios son UTC + 1 hora [ DST ]




Nuevo tema Responder al tema  [ 1132 mensajes ]  Ir a página Anterior  1 ... 72, 73, 74, 75, 76
Autor Mensaje
 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 09 Ago 2019 23:54 
Desconectado
Div@
Div@
Avatar de Usuario

Registrado: 05 Oct 2005 20:42
Mensajes: 2633
Imagen

Andrea Lorenzo Scartazzini (*1971) Born in Basel, he studied there German studies and Italian studies. He changed to studying composition with Rudolf Kelterborn at the Musikhochschule Basel, which he continued with Wolfgang Rihm in Karlsruhe. In 1999/2000, he studied one semester at the Royal Academy of Music. He has worked as a composer, and in the beginning also as a music teacher. His works have been performed at major festivals such as the Salzburg Easter Festival, Lucerne Festival and Darmstädter Ferienkurse. They have been played by ensembles such as Kammerorchester Basel, Collegium Novum Zürich, Ensemble Contrechamps, Ensemble intercontemporain and Ensemble Phoenix. He composed in 2008 Siegel for the Basel Sinfonietta, who premiered it with Claudia Barainsky, conducted by Peter Hirsch. The ensemble premiered in 2012 his Viaggiatori, composed for the centenary of the Basler Bach-Chor. He was in 2004/05 composer in residence at the Witten/Herdecke University. In 2006, his opera Wut premiered at the Theater Erfurt. In 2012, his opera Der Sandmann on a libretto by Thomas Jonigk premiered at the Theater Basel which had commissioned the opera, staged by Christof Loy. His opera Edward II. premiered in February 2017 at the Deutsche Oper Berlin, conducted by Thomas Søndergård and staged again by Loy. Scartazzini received several awards, including the Jacob Burckhardt Prize of the Goethe Foundation Basel (Johann-Wolfgang-von-Goethe-Stiftung), and the study prize (Förderpreis) of the Ernst von Siemens Music Prize in 2000.

Wikipedia

Der Sandmann, ópera en diez escenas (2016). Fragmento.

Imagen

Edward II., ópera en diez escenas (2017). Fragmento.

Imagen

_________________
Imagen


Arriba
 Perfil  
 
 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 16 Ago 2019 17:44 
Desconectado
Div@
Div@
Avatar de Usuario

Registrado: 05 Oct 2005 20:42
Mensajes: 2633
Imagen

Richard Thompson is a performer and composer whose work encompasses jazz and Third Stream composition. Originally from Aberdeen, Scotland, Mr. Thompson made his debut at the Purcell Room, Queen Elizabeth Hall in London. He has appeared in live broadcasts for BBC Jazz and Classical Radio, Italian National Television and Radio and also given concerts at La Piccola Scala in Milan, among many others. Mr. Thompson’s orchestral appearances include concerts with the Harlem Festival Orchestra; the Boston Orchestra and Chorale; the Glasgow Chamber Orchestra; and the Aberdeen Chamber Orchestra. In 1999 Mr. Thompson was awarded the first Individual Artist Award for classical music composition from the Brooklyn Arts Council. His winning piece, Legend of the Moors -a musical depiction of the presence and influence of the Moors in Spain during the Middle Ages- was premiered at the Brooklyn Conservatory. The following year Mr. Thompson’s orchestral piece Voices was premiered by the Long Island Sound Symphony Orchestra (under the direction of Dorothy Savitch). A discussion of some of Mr. Thompson’s compositions appears in the textbook African-American Music, An Introduction by Dr. Earl L. Stewart, published by Simon and Schuster Macmillan/Prentice Hall International. Mr. Thompson’s song cycle The Shadow of Dawn had its world premiere by the Manhattan Chamber Orchestra in 2000 at Merkin Hall, New York City. The performance—under the direction of Richard Auldon Clark—featured Christine Moore, soprano. The inspiration for this song cycle is the work of African American poet Paul Laurence Dunbar.

Mr. Thompson’s chamber opera, The Mask in the Mirror -a dramatization of the courtship and marriage of poet Paul Laurence Dunbar to Alice Ruth Moore- was premiered in 2012 by Trilogy Opera, based in Newark New Jersey, under the artistic directorship of Kevin Maynor. Mr. Thompson was commissioned by the city of San Diego and Caltrans in 2012 to compose a musical tribute to Martin Luther King Jr. to accompany the installation of a mural by artist Philip Matzigkeit which depicts the life and work of Martin Luther King Jr. The piece, I Have Dream, is scored for jazz quintet; male jazz singer; and choir, and was first performed in October 2012. Songs of Solitude, commissioned by soprano Marquita Lister, is a song cycle featuring the poems of Rudi Cleare. Mr. Thompson earned his undergraduate degree in music from the University of Edinburgh, Scotland; his Master’s Degree from Rutgers University in New Jersey; and a jazz diploma from the Berklee College of Music in Boston. While at Rutgers University, Mr. Thompson studied jazz piano with Kenny Barron and classical piano with Theodore Lettvin. Mr. Thompson is currently Associate Professor of Music at San Diego State University, where he teaches theory, jazz performance, and history. He performs frequently in both jazz and classical concerts as a soloist and in many chamber groups, including his own jazz quintet.

The Mask in the Mirror, ópera de cámara en tres actos (2012). Fragmento.

Imagen

_________________
Imagen


Arriba
 Perfil  
 
 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 23 Ago 2019 13:24 
Desconectado
Div@
Div@
Avatar de Usuario

Registrado: 05 Oct 2005 20:42
Mensajes: 2633
Imagen

Joseph Summer (*1956) He was born in Tennessee. Summer began playing the French horn at the age of seven. While attending the Eastern Music Festival in North Carolina at age thirteen he was fortunate to be allowed to study composition with the eminent Czech composer Karel Husa. Two years later he was accepted at Oberlin Conservatory, graduating with a BM in Music Composition in 1976. Recruited by Robert Page to teach at Carnegie Mellon University, Joseph spent two years teaching music theory before leaving to pursue composition full time. In 1981, with assistance from the National Endowment for the Arts, The Tenor’s Suite, Summer’s one act tragedy based on The Tenor by Frank Wedekind was produced in Philadelphia, fully staged through a piano reduction. This lead to Summer creating the Contemporary Opera Company of America. The company, over a two year span, concentrated on producing operas by living American composers, including Summer’s own Hippolytus, with fully staged double piano reduction performances in Pittsburgh and Philadelphia.

For the next twenty years Joseph Summer concentrated his efforts composing a series of comic operas based on the bawdy stories of Boccaccio’s The Decameron. These consist of four completed works: And The Dead Shall Walk The Earth; Courting Disaster; Their Fate In The Hands Of The Friar; and Gianetta. The fifth in a projected cycle of seven: Also Known As is currently in progress. In 2003 Summer founded The Shakespeare Concerts, which has presented more than forty compositions from Summer’s ever expanding collection of settings of the bard’s ever living texts, which he titles The Oxford Songs, (titled thus due to Summer’s support of Edward De Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford, as the likely identity of the author also known as William Shakespeare.) In addition to the individual scenes, sonnets, and songs from Shakespeare collected in the aforementioned collection, Summer completed the opera Hamlet, in 2006.

theportfoliocomposer

The Tempest, ópera de cámara (2013). Fragmento.

Imagen

_________________
Imagen


Arriba
 Perfil  
 
 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 30 Ago 2019 20:15 
Desconectado
Div@
Div@
Avatar de Usuario

Registrado: 05 Oct 2005 20:42
Mensajes: 2633
Imagen

Ferenc Farkas (1905-2000) Born into a musical family (his father played the cimbalom and his mother played the piano) in Nagykanizsa, Hungary. Farkas began his musical studies in Budapest, at the Protestant Gymnasium (Grammar School) and later attended the Music Academy, where he studied composition with Leó Weiner and Albert Siklós. After his graduation in 1927, he worked as a repetiteur and conductor at the Municipal Theatre of Budapest and collaborated with the Diaghilev Ballet. From 1929 to 1931, he attended Ottorino Respighi's masterclass at the Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia in Rome. The years he spent in Rome had a decisive influence on him. He became acquainted with Italian and Mediterranean culture to which he felt a deep attraction. About this he said: "My principal aim has always been to attain for myself a latin clarity and proportion.". Farkas returned to Budapest in the autumn of 1931. As he could not find any other assignments, he played the piano in various theatre orchestras. In 1932 he met the director Paul Fejos for whom he composed several film scores, first in Hungary, then in Vienna and Copenhagen. This collaboration was to be for Farkas the beginning of an impressive series of “applied” music (music for around 75 films and 44 theatre plays and radio plays).

In the spring of 1934 he conducted research of his own into traditional Hungarian music by collecting folk songs in Somogy County: "When I got back from my travels abroad, it became clear to me that the work and research of Bartók and Kodály raised crucial problems that we as Hungarians, had to resolve ourselves. ". From 1935 he taught at the Budapest City Music School. From 1941-1944 he was professor of composition and director at the Conservatory of Kolozsvàr (today Cluj-Napoca in Romania) and he conducted the city's Opera Chorus. At the end of 1944, because of the war, he had to go back to Hungary. During the siege of Budapest, he worked as the deputy conductor of the Opera Chorus. In 1946, he was sent to Székesfehérvár where he founded and managed the Conservatory. He was nominated professor of composition at the Franz Liszt Music Academy of Budapest in 1949, a post he held until his retirement in 1975. As a professor he was to have his greatest influence in the second half of the century. Among his students were: György Kurtág, György Ligeti, and Miklós Kocsár.

Wikipedia

A Bűvös szekrény, ópera cómica en dos actos (1942). Escena segunda del acto primero.

Imagen

_________________
Imagen


Arriba
 Perfil  
 
 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 06 Sep 2019 20:07 
Desconectado
Div@
Div@
Avatar de Usuario

Registrado: 05 Oct 2005 20:42
Mensajes: 2633
Imagen

Francesco (Franco) Antonio Faccio (1840-1891) Born in Verona in humble circumstances, he early manifested a propensity for music and was admitted to the Milan Conservatory in 1855, where he studied composition with Stefano Ronchetti-Montevito. There he struck up a lifelong friendship with Arrigo Boito, two years his junior. Their first collaboration was a patriotic cantata, Il quattro giugno (1860), inspired by the death in battle of a fellow pupil; Boito supplied the text and some of the music. The reception of this work at the conservatory, on the heels of the liberation of Lombardy, was so enthusiastic that the next year they produced a sequel, Le sorelle d’Italia, a panegyric to nations still under foreign domination. In the patriotic fervour of the times both Boito and Faccio, who were natives of the Veneto (then still in the hands of the Austrians), were received, despite their youth, by the upper echelons of Milanese society, including the famous salon of Countess Maffei. Their precosity, talent and determination to renew the tradition of Italian opera won them such warm support that on the completion of their studies they were awarded 2000 lire each to travel abroad.

Arriving in Paris in the spring of 1862, Faccio and Boito were received, not without irony, by Rossini. Countess Maffei had supplied them with letters of introduction to Verdi. Both were hard at work on operas – Boito on what was to become Mefistofele, and Faccio on the three-act melodramma, I profughi fiamminghi, to a text by Emilio Praga. Faccio was the first to return to Milan, where his work was introduced at La Scala on 11 November 1863. He sought to tap again the euphoric spirit of the times, but this opera achieved only five performances. The reception was cool and there were murmurs of that shibboleth, ‘music of the future’. Faccio’s friends fêted him with a banquet, however, and it was on this occasion that Boito read his ode All’arte italiana that so offended Verdi.

Faccio’s second opera, the four-act Amleto, to an innovatory libretto by Boito, was first performed at the Teatro Carlo Felice, Genoa, on 30 May 1865, where its success was contested. There was some resentment of the self-congratulatory iconoclasm of the youthful collaborators, and dismay at the score’s paucity of melody. The only section to win general approval was Ophelia’s funeral march. In 1866 both Faccio and Boito volunteered to serve under Garibaldi. At the end of their brief duty, Faccio left Italy and for two years honed his skills as an opera conductor in Scandinavia. On the strength of this experience, he was offered a post at the Teatro Carcano on his return to Milan in the autumn of 1868. At this time he was also appointed to teach composition at the conservatory, a post he held for ten years. In 1869 he became Terziani’s assistant as conductor at La Scala, succeeding to the full office in 1871.

He won Verdi’s approval to conduct the Italian première of Aida there (8 February 1872). Henceforth, conducting was to be Faccio’s principal activity, particularly after the miserable failure of his remounted Amleto at La Scala the year before, a fiasco that caused him to renounce the writing of operas. His tenure as principal conductor at La Scala lasted until his collapse in December 1889. The chief glory of his period there was the première of Otello (5 February 1887). Although Verdi’s works dominated the repertory during those years, Faccio also conducted the premières of operas by a number of younger Italian composers, notably Ponchielli (I lituani, La Gioconda and Il figliuol prodigo), Catalani (Dejanice and Edmea) and Puccini (the two-act version of Le villi and Edgar). He also conducted important performances of Der Freischütz and Lohengrin, and presented works by Massenet and Bizet. His last task there was the preparation of the first Italian staging of Die Meistersinger.

Faccio was also active elsewhere. At Brescia in 1872 he conducted the revised Forza del destino to such effect that the survival of the work was assured. At Bologna he made a profound impression with Don Carlos in 1878. The following year he conducted a concert there for the local Società del Quartetto; instrumental conducting would soon become second only to his work in the opera house. He led the local premières of Otello in Rome, Venice and Bologna, as well as in London (5 July 1889). Shaw remembered this last occasion as one of the finest examples of opera conducting in his experience. That there were serious problems with Faccio’s health became apparent the night he insisted there was no third act to Die Meistersinger. To provide him with some relief from the rigours of opera-house routine, Verdi arranged his appointment as director of the Parma Conservatory. He soon proved incapable of coping with even this amount of work, and the faithful Boito accompanied him to Kraft-Ebbing’s Sanitorium at Graz. There, his condition was diagnosed as paralysis associated with tertiary syphilis and he spent the brief remainder of his life in an institution at Monza.

Grove

Amleto, tragedia lírica en cuatro actos (1865). Fragmento del acto cuarto.

Imagen

_________________
Imagen


Arriba
 Perfil  
 
 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 13 Sep 2019 19:22 
Desconectado
Div@
Div@
Avatar de Usuario

Registrado: 05 Oct 2005 20:42
Mensajes: 2633
Imagen

Joan Albert Amargós (*1950) Nació en la ciudad de Barcelona, nieto del compositor Joan Altisent i Ceardi. Estudió música en el Conservatorio Superior de Música del Liceu (de cuyo Departamento de Jazz y Música Moderna es actualmente consejero artístico). Sus primeras obras datan de 1969. Fue fundador del grupo Música Urbana, con el que grabó dos discos. En 1983 compone el Concert popular, estrenado al año siguiente en el Palacio de la Música Catalana por la Banda Municipal de Barcelona dirigida por Albert Argudo. En 1999 se toca en el Teatro Monumental de Madrid el Concierto para clarinete y orquesta con la Orquesta de Radio Televisión Española, dirigida por Tamás Vásáry, y el clarinetista Isaac Rodríguez, previamente estrenado por Walter Boeykens y la Orquesta del Teatre Lliure. Su ópera de cámara Eurídice (Eurídice y los títeres de Caronte), para mezzosoprano y barítono acompañados de violín, violonchelo, contrabajo y bandoneón, y con libreto de Toni Rumbau, fue estrenada el 2 de julio de 2001 en el Convento de los Ángeles de Barcelona con Claudia Schneider y Cristina Zavalloni como mezzos y Marc Canturri y Enric Martínez-Castignani como barítonos. El propio Amargós dirigió para la ocasión a la Orquesta Barcelona 216, encargándose de la escenografía José Menchero, de la dirección escénica Luca Valentino y de la manipulación de los títeres el libretista, Toni Rumbau. Por encargo de Richard Rimbert, clarinetista solista de la Orquesta de Burdeos, compone el Atlantic Trio, para violín, clarinete y piano, que se estrena el 10 de mayo de 2003 en la escuela de música Guildhall School of Music and Drama de Londres con el violinista Stephane Rougier, el pianista Hervé N´Kaoua y Rimbert al clarinete.

En 2004 compone, nuevamente con texto de Toni Rumbau, L´Assemblea dels infants (Cantata per a nens), obra para coro de niños de entre ocho y doce años acompañado por una orquesta de cámara de nueve instrumentos (piano, percusión, trompeta, dos trompas, trombón, trombón bajo, violín y contrabajo). La obra fue estrenada en el Auditorio de Barcelona el 9 de mayo de 2005. En 2005 compone el Northern Concerto para flauta dulce y orquesta, que es nominado para un Premio Grammy y recibe el Premio de la Música como "Autor de Música Clásica". En 23 de enero de 2006 estrena en el Auditorio de Barcelona, con la Orquesta Nacional de Cambra d´Andorra dirigida por Gerard Claret, La Pastoreta, obra basada en variaciones sobre la conocida melodía popular catalana homónima. El estreno es para una orquesta de cuerda con doce violines, seis violas, cuatro violonchelos y dos contrabajos, aunque también se puede interpretar con una orquesta menor. En 2006 compone, por encargo de las pianistas Katia y Marielle Labèque, Las morillas que me enamoran y Variaciones sobre un zorongo, composiciones para piano a cuatro manos y contralto, que se estrenarán el 30 de marzo del año siguiente en el Teatro Comunale de Treviso (Italia). También en 2006 escribe otras tres composiciones dedicadas a las Hermanas Labèque: Las morillas de Jaén, Anda jaleo y Zorongo (las dos últimas para dos pianos y voz), y Jocs Florals, obra para coro de hombres solistas (cuatro tenores, cuatro barítonos y cuatro bajos) y órgano, estrenada el 19 de octubre en la iglesia de Santa María del Mar de Barcelona. En octubre de 2007 estrena en el Teatre Nacional de Catalunya, de nuevo con libreto de Toni Rumbau, la ópera El salón de Anubis. El 13 de abril de 2008 dirige en Barcelona el estreno de su Concierto para saxo alto y orquesta de cámara, con Albert Julià y la Orquestra de Cambra de Granollers.

Wikipedia

Eurídice (Eurídice y los títeres de Caronte), ópera en un acto (2001). Fragmento.

Imagen

_________________
Imagen


Arriba
 Perfil  
 
 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 20 Sep 2019 20:41 
Desconectado
Div@
Div@
Avatar de Usuario

Registrado: 05 Oct 2005 20:42
Mensajes: 2633
Imagen

Jerónimo Francisco de Lima (1743-1822). He was born in Lisbon. He studied at the Seminário da Patriarcal in Lisbon, and from 1761 to 1767 at the Conservatorio di S Onofrio a Capuana in Naples, together with João de Sousa Carvalho. On his return to Lisbon he was appointed organist and mestre at the Seminário da Patriarcal and began to write in a variety of genres, including serenatas and drammi per musica da cantarsi written for court or private performance. Among them was Le nozze d’Ercole e d’Ebe, given in 1785 at the Spanish Ambassador’s palace in Lisbon to celebrate a double wedding between the Spanish and Portuguese royal families. In 1787 he was in the service of the English writer William Beckford during the latter’s stay in Sintra, near Lisbon, and his music is favourably mentioned by Beckford, who, however, was not pleased with the £200 bill that Lima presented on his departure. He was also composing much sacred music and replaced Carvalho as primeiro mestre de capela of the Seminário in 1798. Lima’s two three-act drammi giocosi were first performed during Carnival at the court’s winter palace at Salvaterra de Magos: Lo spirito di contradizione in 1772, and La vera costanza in 1785. Lo spirito di contradizione, which was revived at the Teatro de S Carlos in Lisbon in 1985, reveals in its accompanied recitatives and rich orchestration the possible influence of Jommelli, the favourite composer of the Lisbon court.

Grove

Teseo, dramma per musica da cantarsi (1783). Aria: Dall’a speme, dall’amore.

Imagen

_________________
Imagen


Arriba
 Perfil  
 
Mostrar mensajes previos:  Ordenar por  
Nuevo tema Responder al tema  [ 1132 mensajes ]  Ir a página Anterior  1 ... 72, 73, 74, 75, 76

Todos los horarios son UTC + 1 hora [ DST ]


¿Quién está conectado?

Usuarios navegando por este Foro: Google [Bot] y 6 invitados


No puede abrir nuevos temas en este Foro
No puede responder a temas en este Foro
No puede editar sus mensajes en este Foro
No puede borrar sus mensajes en este Foro

   
     
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group
Traducción al español por Huan Manwë para phpbb-es.com