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Zelenka escribió:
Lamento no poder continuar con el hilo, pero el Goear me dice siempre lo mismo. :?


Me pasó lo mismo en plena presentación de Wozzeck, al cabo de poco se restableció el servicio.


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Josef Bohuslav Foerster (1859–1951) He was born in Dětenice, in an area called the Bohemian Paradise. His was a musical family normally living in Prague, where his father, a composer also named Josef Foerster, taught at the Conservatory. (His father's students included Franz Lehár.) Josef was educated accordingly, and duly studied there. He also showed an early interest in the theatre, and even thought of becoming an actor. From 1884 he worked as a critic, and he would prove to be a writer of distinction. In 1893 he married the leading Czech soprano Berta Lautererová (Bertha Lauterer) in Hamburg, during ten years making his living there as a critic, and she was engaged at the Hamburg Staatsoper.

In 1901 he became a teacher at the Hamburg conservatory. In 1903 Berta went to sing at the Vienna Hofoper, and so Josef moved there with her, continuing to make a living as a music critic. He returned to Prague on the foundation of the Czechoslovak Republic in 1918, thereafter teaching at the conservatory and the university. Foerster produced numerous compositions. His music is not nationalistic in the sense of employing the idioms of Czech folk music. His work, words and music, is considered very subjective and personal, mystical and idealistic. Foerster's opera Eva, is another example, like Leoš Janáček's Jenůfa, of a libretto based on a play by Gabriela Preissová, though his treatment differs. In 1946 he was declared a National Composer.

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Eva, ópera en tres actos (1895-1897). Fragmento del acto segundo.

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Última edición por Zelenka el 25 May 2014 8:16, editado 3 veces en total

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Ján Cikker (1911–1989) He was born in Besztercebánya, Slovakia. His first music teachers were his mother, Mária Psotková, and Viliam Figuš-Bystrý. After he graduated from the high school, he studied at the Prague Conservatory from 1930 to 1935, where he attended courses of composition of Jaroslav Křička, of conducting and organ. He then studied at the Master's School of the Prague Conservatory from 1935 to 1946, where he was a student of Vítězslav Novák. Later on, he moved to Vienna, where he studied with Felix Weingartner from 1936 to 1937. From 1939 to 1949, he taught at the Bratislava Conservatory. At the same time he was a repertory advisor of the opera of the Slovak National Theatre from 1945 to 1948. He was forced to leave this post after the communist takeover of Czechoslovakia in 1948. Finally, he worked as professor for composition at the Bratislava Academy of Music and Dramatic Arts (VŠMÚ), where he was the teacher of many Slovak composers. A museum in his name has opened in Bratislava.

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Vzkriesenie, ópera en tres actos (1960). Fragmento del acto segundo.

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Última edición por Zelenka el 25 May 2014 8:22, editado 2 veces en total

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Édouard Victoire Antoine Lalo (1823–1892) He was born in Lille (Nord), in northernmost France. He attended that city's music conservatory in his youth. Lalo left home at the age of 16 because his father did not want him to be a professional musician. He studied the violin at the Paris Conservatoire, also learning composition privately. While supporting himself as a violinist, performing and giving lessons, Lalo also composed. His early works, published in the 1840s, include pieces for the violin. In the 1850s, Lalo became an important member of a movement to revive chamber music in France. By the mid-1850s, he had already composed two Piano trios, which show a considerable mastery of that form. In 1855, Lalo helped found the Armingaud Quartet; this ensemble was created to promote the music of Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Schumann, and Mendelssohn. Lalo, who was the quartet's violist and second violinist, composed a String quartet in 1859, thus enhancing his stature as a composer of chamber music. In 1865, Lalo married Julie Bernier de Maligny, a singer who eventually became a leading performer of his songs.

Nevertheless, Lalo wished to compose for the stage, and in 1866 he started writing Fiesque, an opera based on Friedrich Schiller's play Fiesko. While Lalo was pleased by his opera, the Paris Opera decided against producing this work. However, despite this setback, Lalo's career flourished. The creation, in 1871, of the Societe Nationale de Musique, whose program was to promote the works of contemporary composers, provided Lalo with an impetus to continue composing for the orchestra. Thus, during the 1870s, Lalo composed several impressive works, including a Violin Concerto in F major, the famous Symphonie espagnole, the Cello Concerto, and the Fantaisie norvegienne for violin and orchestra.

In 1875, Lalo started work on Le Roi d'Ys, an opera based on a Breton legend. Feeling that his work was nearing completion, Lalo offered it to the Opera in 1881. Once again, theaters refused to produce Lalo's work; however, perhaps wishing to somehow compensate the composer, the Opera asked him to compose a ballet. During 1881 and 1882 Lalo wrote Namouna, based on a story from Casanova's Memoires, and the ballet was performed in 1883 to a less-than-appreciative audience. Throughout the 1880s, however, Lalo continued promoting Le Roi d'Ys. The opera was finally performed at the Opera-Comique in 1888, and the reception was extremely favorable. Following this belated triumph, Lalo embarked on several new projects, including Neron, a pantomime, which was performed in 1891. A new opera, La jacquerie, remained unfinished.

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Fiesque, gran ópera en tres actos (1866–1868). Comienzo del acto primero.

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Le Roi d'Ys, ópera en tres actos, cinco cuadros (1878). Comienzo del acto tercero.

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Última edición por Zelenka el 25 May 2014 8:25, editado 3 veces en total

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Edward German (1862–1936) German was born German Edward Jones in Whitchurch, Shropshire, England, the second of five children. He was the older of two sons of John David Jones, a liquor merchant, brewer, church organist and lay preacher at the local Congregational Chapel, and Elizabeth (Betsy) Cox, a teacher of Bible classes for young women. His parents called him Jim. He began to study piano and organ with his father at the age of five. At the age of six, he formed a boys' concert band to perform locally, teaching himself the violin, composition, and music arrangement in the process. He later sang alto in the church choir and participated in family entertainments above his uncle's grocery shop, often playing piano duets and performing comic sketches with his elder sister Ruth. He also wrote comic poems. In his mid-teens, German's parents attempted to apprentice him to a shipbuilding firm, as they believed their son had an aptitude for engineering. His studies at a boarding-school in Chester had been delayed by a serious illness, however, and so he was turned away for being too old to begin an apprenticeship. In his teens he formed a second band, a quintette, including himself on the violin, his sister on the pianoforte or the bass and three friends of the family, for which German prepared the orchestrations. He also led the town orchestra, did some amateur acting and sang comic songs in local village halls.

At the age of 18, following private study with Cecil Walter Hay of Shrewsbury, the conductor of the Whithurch choral society, German entered the Royal Academy of Music, where he eventually changed his name to J. E. German (and later simply Edward German) to avoid confusion with another student named Edward Jones. He continued his studies of violin and organ, also beginning a more formal study of composition under Ebenezer Prout. Many of German's student works were played at Academy concerts. In 1884, the Academy appointed German a sub-professor of the violin. During his time as an instructor, he was well regarded and won several medals and prizes such as the Tubbs Bow for his skill with the violin. In 1885, he won the Charles Lucas Medal for his Te Deum for soloists, choir and organ, leading him to change his focus from violin to composition. He soon wrote a light opera, The Two Poets (for four soloists and piano) in 1886, which was produced at the Academy and then performed at St. George's Hall. In 1887, his first symphony, in E Minor, was also performed at the Academy. In 1890 he conducted a revised version of this symphony at the Crystal Palace, and The Two Poets toured successfully in England.

During his time at the Royal Academy, German taught at Wimbledon School and played the violin in theatre orchestras, including the Savoy Theatre. He visited Germany in 1886 and 1888–89 and was impressed by its opera, particularly at Bayreuth. He also became engaged to Ethel Mary Boyce (1863–1936) from Chertsey, Surrey, who was also a promising composition student at the Academy. She won the Lady Goldsmid scholarship in 1885, the Sterndale Bennett Prize in 1886 and the Charles Lucas Medal in 1889. Though the engagement was broken off, they remained friends. German never married. Though German had little experience with opera or choral music, Richard D'Oyly Carte invited him to finish Arthur Sullivan's The Emerald Isle for the Savoy Theatre after Sullivan's death in 1900. He accepted, giving up his violin concerto commission for the Leeds Festival to meet the deadlines. The success of his score for the opera (which was performed into the 1920s) opened up a new career for him. His next comic opera, in 1902, was Merrie England, with Basil Hood, the librettist for The Emerald Isle. This was perhaps German's greatest success, and its dance music was popular separately. Indeed, it was revived frequently, becoming a light opera standard in Britain, and several of its songs, including "The English Rose", "O Peaceful England" and "The Yeomen of England" were popular until the middle of the twentieth century.

After this, German and Hood collaborated again in 1903 to write A Princess of Kensington. This opera was unsuccessful, although it toured briefly and had a New York production. German turned to other endeavours, composing music to Rudyard Kipling texts, including the twelve songs in the Just So Song Book in 1903. He also received a steady flow of orchestral commissions, leading to works such as his Welsh Rhapsody for the Cardiff Festival in 1904, featuring as its climax "Men of Harlech". German returned to writing comic operas, achieving another success with Tom Jones for the Apollo Theatre in 1907, produced by Robert Courtneidge for the Fielding bicentenary. The score is one of German's finest works and received a production in New York (with German conducting), was performed for decades and spawned separate performances of its dance music. He next collaborated with W. S. Gilbert on his final (and unsuccessful) opera, Fallen Fairies, at the Savoy in 1909. In the wake of the failure of Fallen Fairies and his unhappy experience with it, German effectively ended his career as a composer of new works, only returning to composition on a few rare occasions, including a march and hymn for the coronation of King George V in 1911, his Theme and Six Diversions in 1919, and his final major work, the Othello-inspired tone poem The Willow Song in 1922.

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Tom Jones, ópera cómica en tres actos (1907). Comienzo del primer acto.

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Última edición por Zelenka el 25 May 2014 8:27, editado 2 veces en total

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Conradin Kreutzer (1780–1849) He was born in Messkirch in Baden, Germany. He learned music theory and several instruments in his youth, but studied law briefly at the end of the 1790s until his father's death in 1800 freed him to pursue a career in music. By 1804 he turned up in Vienna, where he met Haydn and probably studied with Albrechtsberger. During this period Kreutzer composed several stage works, mostly in the singspiel style, but had little luck getting them performed until 1810. He supported himself by giving lessons, and touring Germany demonstrating Franz Leppich's musical contraption, the panmelodicon. Kreutzer then settled in Stuttgart, where he finally found some success; at least three of his operas were staged there in 1811-1812, and he was awarded the post of Hofkapellmeister. Political intrigues drove Kreutzer from Stuttgart in 1816, but not before he had befriended poet Johann Ludwig Uhland, with whom he would collaborate many times over the years. After Stuttgart, Kreutzer toured repeatedly and took a series of Kapellmeister posts, ultimately attaching himself to theaters in Vienna, where he was able to produce his operas with increasing success. He traveled more in the 1840s, working in Germany and accompanying his two opera-singing daughters on tour. Kreutzer's music resembles that of Weber to some degree.

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Das Nachtlager von Granada, ópera romántica en dos actos (1833). Escena sexta.


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Última edición por Zelenka el 25 May 2014 8:29, editado 2 veces en total

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Egon Joseph Wellesz (1885–1974) He was born in Vienna. Wellesz studied under Arnold Schoenberg - purportedly his first private pupil - as well as Guido Adler, who founded the musicological institute in Vienna and was a leading editor of the Austrian Denkmaler. These dual influences shaped much of his musical and scholarly life. In 1913, Wellesz embarked upon a lifelong interest in Byzantine music. Wellesz left Austria for England in the wake of the Anschluss — more specifically, he was in Amsterdam at the time by good fortune, as Wellesz was there hearing Bruno Walter conduct his (Wellesz') orchestral piece Prosperos Beschwörungen on that day. Wrote nine symphonies and an equal number of string quartets, the former starting, in 1945, only with his arrival in England and the latter series of works spread throughout his life. Also wrote much other music including operas, an octet with the same instrumentation as Schubert's, piano and violin concertos (one of each, and a suite for violin and orchestra besides), for instance.

Stylistically his earliest music, somewhat like that of Ernst Krenek, is in a very harsh but tonal style; there is a definite second period of sorts around the time of the first two symphonies (1940s) in which his music has a somewhat Brucknerian sound — in the symphonies sometimes an equal breadth, though still with something of a 20th-century feel and harmonies, and after his Fourth Symphony his music is more pan-tonal/non-tonal, serial in character. This is consistent, in for instance the 8th quartet, with hints of tonality. Wellesz is principally remembered for his extensive scholarly contributions to the study of Byzantine music for which he was awarded an honorary doctorate from Oxford (where he later taught) in 1932.
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Die Bakchantinnen, ópera en dos actos (1931). Fragmento del acto primero.

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Última edición por Zelenka el 25 May 2014 8:30, editado 2 veces en total

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Nguyen Thien Dao (*1940) He was born in Hanoï, Vietnam. He arrived in France in 1953, entered the Conservatoire National Supérieur de Musique de Paris in 1963. His decisive meeting with Olivier Messiaen in 1967, in whose class he received the 1st prize for composition, led him to discovering the path that would become his own. At first filled with images from his childhood and long meditations on nature, possessed by "celestial and wholly imaginary polyphony", and then Vietnamese and Chinese poetry, he sees himself as "heir to two civilizations; oriental and occidental". He was tried to "work out a synthesis by constructing a music based on micro-intervals, sound colors, rhythmic structure and time duration. He hopes to be seen as a creator of a "lyrical, passionate music of an epic character", constantly concerned with "demanding requirements of musical craft and form." In 1969, he was discovered at the Festival de Royan with Tuyan Lua, for ensemble. His orchestral work, Koskom, was premiered at Radio-France in 1971, and in 1972, Ba Me Vietnam, for double-bass and twenty instruments, at the Festival de La Rochelle. In 1974, he received the 1st Olivier Messiaen Prize in composition (Erasme Fondation of Holland). In 1978, his opera My Châu-Trong Thuy was premiered at the Opéra de Paris (Salle Favart). In 1984, he received the André Caplet Prize (Académie des Beaux-Arts) and his Concerto for piano and orchestra was premiered at the Rencontres de Metz.

Les enfants d’Izieu, ópera-oratorio (1993). Action III Auschwitz.

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Última edición por Zelenka el 25 May 2014 8:32, editado 2 veces en total

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Ruperto Chapí y Lorente (1851-1909) Nació en la ciudad de Villena, Alicante. Era el quinto hijo de un modesto barbero cuya afición a la música ya venía de generaciones anteriores. Siguiendo la tradición familiar Chapí y sus hermanos comenzaron a estudiar solfeo desde muy pequeños. Desde su infancia aprendió a tocar el flautín y el cornetín; a los nueve años entró a formar parte de la banda Música Nueva, de su localidad natal. Su padre, fue su primer maestro. A los doce años compone su primera zarzuela: Estrella del Bosque. Sus padres, conscientes de sus grandes aptitudes musicales, envían a Chapí con dieciséis años a Madrid para que amplíe sus horizontes y complete su formación. En esta ciudad ingresa en el Conservatorio, con el maestro Arrieta, donde en 1872 logra el Primer Premio de fin de carrera, junto con su condiscípulo Tomás Bretón. Allí estudiaría armonía y composición y, para sufragar sus gastos, en 1870 ingresa como profesor de cornetín en la orquesta del Circo Price (donde también tocaba Tomás Bretón).

En este lugar estrena su primera zarzuela, Abel y Caín, sin demasiado éxito; y en el Teatro Real La hija de Jefté en 1874; con esta pieza consigue una beca para viajar a París y a Roma para ampliar estudios, en ésta última fue donde comenzó a componer sus primeras óperas. Al volver a España, en 1878, comienza su carrera como compositor de zarzuela grande, alcanzando gran éxito con obras como: La tempestad (1882), La bruja (1887) y El rey que rabió (1891). Llegando a la cumbre con El tambor de granaderos y La revoltosa (1897). Entrado el siglo XX cuatro son sus obras esenciales: La patria chica, La venta de Don Quijote, Circe (1902) y Margarita la Tornera (1909). Cabe destacar también, que fue el fundador de la Sociedad General de Autores y Escritores (S.G.A.E.), en 1893, una organización destinada a regular los derechos de los compositores, como por ejemplo, el registro de las obras para evitar plagios o el control de las representaciones o interpretaciones de una obra.

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Margarita la Tornera, leyenda lírica en tres actos (1909). Comienzo del acto segundo.

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Última edición por Zelenka el 25 May 2014 8:34, editado 2 veces en total

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 Asunto: Bomarzo y Don Rodrigo de Ginastera
NotaPublicado: 09 May 2010 2:44 
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Para los que estén interesados es posible descargar "Bomarzo" de Ginastera del torrent. Sólo escriban "bomarzo ginastera" en el buscador y listo. Nada más existe una grabación de 1967 con el reparto original del estreno de la ópera, que es la que se puede descargar. Aprovechen!, creo que es casi imposible encontrarla por otro lado.

Y una inquietud, alguien sabe si existe alguna grabación de "Don Rodrigo"?, sólo sé que fue uno de los primeros papeles que cantó Plácido Domingo, en 1964. Le agradecería mucho.


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Gracias como siempre Zelenka

:aplauso: :aplauso: :aplauso: :aplauso: :aplauso: :aplauso: :aplauso: :aplauso: :aplauso: :aplauso: :aplauso: :aplauso: :aplauso: :aplauso: :aplauso:


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:wink:


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Me pregunto si este es el hilo para poner este artículo (interesante, pero en inglés). Pero no se me ocurre otro mejor.

http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-enter ... 68227.html


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Lukas Foss (1922–2009) American composer, conductor, and educator Lukas Foss contributed profoundly to the circulation and appreciation of music of the twentieth century. He was born in Berlin, Germany. He began his musical studies in Berlin, where he studied piano and theory with Julius Goldstein. Goldstein introduced Foss to the music of Bach, Mozart, and Beethoven, which had a profound effect on Foss's musical development. In 1933, Foss went to Paris where he studied piano with Lazare Lévy as well as composition with Noël Gallon, orchestration with Felix Wolfes, and flute with Louis Moyse. Foss remained in Paris until 1937, when he moved with his family to the United States, continuing his musical instruction at the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia. In addition, Foss studied conducting with Koussevitzky during the summers from 1939 to 1943 at the Berkshire Music Center. He also studied composition with Paul Hindemith as a special student at Yale from 1939 to 1940.

Foss began to compose at the age of seven and was first published at 15. At the age of 22, he won the New York Music Critic's Award for his cantata Prairie, which was premiered by the Collegiate Chorale, under the direction of Robert Shaw. From 1944-1950, Foss served as the pianist of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. In 1945, he was the youngest composer ever to receive a Guggenheim fellowship. From 1950-1951, he was a fellow at the American Academy in Rome, and received a Fulbright grant for 1950-1952.

In February of 1953, Foss received an appointment as professor of music at the University of California at Los Angeles — succeeding Arnold Schoenberg — where he taught composition and conducting. While at UCLA, Foss founded the groundbreaking Improvisation Chamber Ensemble. He served from 1963-1970 as music director and conductor of the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra. In 1963, at the State University of New York at Buffalo, Foss founded, and became the director of, the Center for Creative and Performing Arts. In 1971, Foss became the conductor of the Brooklyn Philharmonic, a position which he held until 1990 when he was named Conductor-Laureate. In 1972, he was appointed conductor of the Kol Israel Orchestra of Jerusalem. From 1972-1973, Foss served as composer-in-residence at the Manhattan School of Music in New York, and from 1981-1986, was conductor of the Milwaukee Symphony.

Foss was a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and from 1989-1990, served as composer in residence at the Tanglewood Music Center. Foss became professor of music at the School for the Arts at Boston University in 1991. He also traveled widely, appearing as a guest conductor with many American and European Orchestras, and lecturing at many North American colleges and universities, including Harvard and Carnegie Mellon.

The compositions of Lukas Foss illustrate two main periods in his artistic development, separated by a middle, avant-garde phase. The works of his first period are predominantly neo-classic in style, and reflect his love of Bach and Stravinsky. In the transitional period he fused elements of controlled improvisation and chance operations with 12-tone, and serialist techniques. Notable works of this period include the Baroque Variations for orchestra, and the chamber works Time Cycle (1960), Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blackbird (1978), and Echoi (1963). His later period works, including the Renaissance Concerto (1990) for flute, embrace a wide variety of musical references, displaying a keen awareness of idioms and styles that span the history of western art music.

Griffelkin, ópera en tres actos (1953–1955). Comienzo del acto segundo.

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Última edición por Zelenka el 25 May 2014 8:40, editado 2 veces en total

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Maravillosos hilo, Zelenka :aplauso: :nw:

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