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Corregido. :oops:


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Johann Ernst Galliard (1687–1749) He was born in Zelle, Germany to a French wig-maker. His first composition formation began at age 15. Galliard studied composition under Farinelli, the director of music at the Court of Hanover, and Abbate Steffani. In addition to his composition ability, he was also a capable oboe and recorder player. Galliard made a step forward in his musical career when he performed one of his original compositions. This Sonata for oboe and two bassoons debuted at one Farinelli’s concerts. Galliard earned an esteemed seat in the chamber music of George. Prince of Denmark. Later, he moved to England where he would become the next chapel-master of the Somerset-House. Galliard became a familiar face in high society due to his proximity to and frequenting of the royal residence. In response to war victories, Galliard composed Te Deum, Jubilate, and three additional anthems.

Bigger and better things seemed promising following his participation in the founding of the Academy of Ancient Music. However, in the scrap for kingdom wide directorial status, Galliard fell short to greats such as Handel and Bononcini. He wrote the music to Clypso and Tlemachus upon the request of a friend, the poet John Hughes. Despite approval from his peers, the show was a failure. As a result, he was refocused on his oboe performance. He joined Handel’s Italian Opera in 1713 as an oboe soloist. Galliard composed several more cantatas to texts by Hughes and Congreve. He published an opera, music to the Morning Hymn of Adam and Eve taken form Milton’s Paradise Lost, and a large number of pantomimes which he turned out under contract to Rich, the enterprising manager of the Lincoln’s-Inn-Fields Theatre. His published instrumental music includes the following: Six Sonatas for a Flute and a Thorough Bass, Six Solos for the Violoncello, and Six Sonatas for the Bassoon or Violoncello with a Thorough Bass for the Harpsichord.

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Pan and Syrinx, ópera en un acto (1718). Aria Go leave me 'tis in vain. Aria Fairest if thou canst be kind, Ah!.

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Última edición por Zelenka el 24 May 2014 20:54, editado 2 veces en total

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Antonio Smareglia (1854-1929) He was born in the town of Pula (on the Istrian peninsula, then located in Austria-Hungary, now in Croatia), in a house on Via Nettuno which still stands and in which there is now a small museum of his life and work. He was the sixth, but first surviving, child of an Italian father, Francesco Smareglia from Dignano - and a Croatian mother - Giulia Stiglich from Ičići. He studied with Faccio at the Milan Conservatory (1873-7), becoming attached to Boito and the Scapigliatura, a literary reform movement. With a passion for Wagner he devoted himself to opera, composing ten (one destroyed) between 1879 and 1914. Il vassallo di Szigeth (1889) and Cornil Schut (1893) show dramatic energy and Oceàna (1903) striking symphonic writing, but the best is perhaps Nozze istriane (1895), with its rustic setting and tamed verismo style, reflecting Mascagni's Cavalleria rusticana. He became blind at the age of 46. Unjustly neglected by the public, he owed his survival to the patronage of Toscanini, the Tartini Conservatory at Trieste and the industrialist Carlo Sai.

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Nozze Istriane, drama en tres actos (1895). Final del acto primero.

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Última edición por Zelenka el 24 May 2014 20:56, editado 2 veces en total

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Hermosa música. Brillaría más en esta toma si el tenor fuera mejor.


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Domènec Terradellas (1713–1751) Born in Barcelona, he first studied with Francisco Valls of Barcelona Cathedral. In 1732 he went to Naples to become a student of Francesco Durante at the Conservatorio dei Poveri di Gesù Cristo. His first opera, Astarto, was written in Rome in 1739. His best known work, Merope, was also composed there in 1743. He also worked at the Spanish church in Rome, 1743-5. In 1746 he went to London where he was in charge of the opera at the King's Theatre for a season. However he was not successful and apparently soon left, eventually finding his way back to Turin for which he produce a Didone abbandonata in 1750, and Rome where his Sesostri re d'Egitto was a considerable success in 1751. In all he composed ten opere serie, three other stage works, two oratorios and much church music, using a vigorous italianate style notable for its vigour and strong contrasts. His operas were among the first to use wind instruments in accompanied recitative. He died suddenly in 1751 in circumstances that have never been explained.

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Artaserse, dramma per musica en tres actos (1744). Aria, Deh respirar lasciatemi. Aria, Torna innocente.

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Última edición por Zelenka el 24 May 2014 21:00, editado 1 vez en total

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Después de un par de meses desconectado del foro, lo primero que he hecho es ver las novedades del amigo Zelenka y como siempre ME SIGUES SORPRENDIENDO CON MÚSICAS FANTÁSTICAS. Trataré de ponerme al día a marchas forzadas por lo pronto localié VIENTO ES LA DICHA DEL AMOR (maravillosa), y mientras escribo estoy con ERKEL y la verdad que me está gustando mucho.
Zelenka........ MUUUUUUUUUUUUUCHAS GRACIAS


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De nada. :wink:


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Gracias por las presentaciones, Zelenka. Creo que la de "Pan & Syrinx" es una de las pocas óperas que conozco de las aparecidas en este hilo. :oops:

Un saludo. :wink:

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tu, l' Eterna canzon!


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:wink:


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Paul Dukas (1865-1935) He was born in Paris to the family of a cultured Parisian banker, he was the second of three children; his mother was the musician in the family and she died when he was five. He studied the piano without displaying special aptitude in music until he was 14. While convalescing from an illness, he started composing, and from that point on, he gravitated toward music, enrolling at the Paris Conservatoire when he was 16. He studied harmony, piano, conducting, and orchestration and at 17, he wrote his first two adult compositions, overtures to Goethe's Götz von Berlichingen and Shakespeare's King Lear. He formally studied composition with Ernest Guiraud but left the conservatory in 1888, frustrated over his inability to win any prizes for his early work and he was being confronted by the military draft. Following his service in the army, he returned to civilian life as a critic and composer, enjoying his first success in the latter capacity in 1892 with the premiere of his overture Polyeucte. The same year, he began the first of several attempts to compose an opera, but he was to see no success in that genre for years to come; rather, he wrote his two most well-known instrumental works: the Symphony in C (1896) and L'apprenti sorcier (1897). The latter, based on Goethe's Der Zauberlehrling, became one of the most popular orchestral works of the late Romantic era with its rich coloration, and it was quickly taken into the repertory of conductors around the world. For the next decade, he devoted himself to an opera, Ariane et Barbe-bleue, based on the work of Maurice Maeterlinck, while continuing to write criticism and completing his Sonata for piano in E flat minor (1900). Dukas completed his ballet La Péri in 1912, but his later output was blighted by an increasingly self-critical outlook, which caused him to abandon and destroy many works. Only four pieces from the last 23 years of his life ever saw the light of day. In his final decades, Dukas achieved renown as a teacher and his students included Messiaen and Duruflé.

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Ariane et Barbe-Bleue, cuento en tres actos (1907). Fragmento del acto segundo.

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Última edición por Zelenka el 24 May 2014 21:02, editado 2 veces en total

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Estupenda la Ariane de Dukas, voy en su búsqueda :wink:


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Sos un genio Zelenka :wink:


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franverdi escribió:
Estupenda la Ariane de Dukas, voy en su búsqueda :wink:


Hay algunas buenas opciones en el club de ópera compartida, si quieres un "puente", ya sabes.

La "Ariane" es estupenda como corresponde a un compositor como Dukas. Un buen ejemplo de ópera olvidada que, sólo por su orquestación, merecería estar programada y conocida.

El Liceu la va a montar próximamente, entonces será la oportunidad.


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Qué gozada la Ariane!! Yo también emprendo búsqueda!!!

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En la vida humana sólo unos pocos sueños se cumplen, la gran mayoría se roncan. Enrique Jardiel Poncela.


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Leonard Bernstein (1918-1990) Leonard Bernstein was born Louis Bernstein in Lawrence, Massachusetts, to Russian-Jewish immigrants. He changed his name to Leonard at the age of sixteen. The family soon moved to Boston, where Leonard studied at Boston Latin School and Harvard University. Although he had taken piano lessons from the age of 10 and engaged in musical activities at college, his intensive musical training began only in 1939 at the Curtis Institute. The following summer, at the Berkshire Music Festival, he met Serge Koussevitsky, who was to be his chief mentor in the early years. On Koussevitsky's recommendation two years later, Artur Rodzinski made Bernstein his assistant conductor at the New York Philharmonic. The suddenness of this appointment, coming after two somewhat directionless years, was superseded only by the dramatic events of November 14, 1943. With less than 24 hours' notice and no rehearsal, Bernstein substituted for the ailing Bruno Walter at Carnegie Hall and led the Philharmonic through a difficult program which he had studied hastily at best. By the concert's end the audience knew it had witnessed the debut of a born conductor. The New York Times ran a front-page story the following morning, and Bernstein's career as a public figure had begun. During the next few years he was guest conductor of every major orchestra in the United States until, in 1958, he became music director of the New York Philharmonic.

Bernstein's multi-faceted career might have filled several average lives. It is surprising that one who had never given a solo recital would be recognized as a pianist; nevertheless, he was so recognized from his appearances as conductor-pianist in performances of Mozart concertos and the Ravel Concerto in G. As a composer, Bernstein was a controversial figure. His large works, including the symphonies Jeremiah (1943), Age of Anxiety (1949), and Kaddish (1963), are not acknowledged masterpieces. Yet they are skillfully wrought and show his sensitivity to subtle changes of musical dialect. He received more praise for his Broadway musicals. The vivid On the Town (1944) and Wonderful Town (1952) were followed by Candide (1956), which, though not a box-office success, is considered by many to be Bernstein's most original score. West Side Story (1957) received international acclaim. Bernstein's music, with its strong contrasts of violence and tenderness, sustains - indeed determines - the feeling of the show and contributes to its special place in the history of American musical theater. His role as an educator, in seminars at Brandeis University (1952-1957) and in teaching duties at Tanglewood, should not be overlooked. He found an even larger audience through television, where his animation and distinguished simplicity had an immediate appeal. Two books of essays, Joy of Music (1959) and Infinite Variety of Music (1966), were direct products of television presentations.

Bernstein had his greatest impact as a conductor. His appearances abroad - with or without the Philharmonic - elicited an excitement approaching frenzy. These responses were due in part to Bernstein's dynamism, particularly effective in music of strong expressionistic profile. It is generally agreed that his readings of 20th century American scores showed a fervor and authority rarely approached by those of his colleagues. His performances and recordings also engendered a revival of interest in Mahler's music. There was some surprise when, in 1967, Bernstein resigned as music director of the Philharmonic. But it was in keeping with his peripatetic nature and the diversity of his activities that he should seek new channels of expression. After leaving the Philharmonic, Bernstein traveled extensively, serving as guest conductor for many of the major symphonies of the world including the Vienna Philharmonic and the Berlin Philharmonic. He became something of a fixture in those cities in the last few decades of his life. More controversially, he also became caught up in the cultural upheaval of the late 1960s. He angered many when he claimed all music, other than pop, seemed old-fashioned and musty. Politically, too, he drew criticism. When his wife hosted a fund-raiser for the Black Panthers in 1970, charges of anti-Semitism were leveled against Bernstein himself. He had not organized the event, but the press reports caused severe damage to his reputation. This event, along with his participation in anti-Vietnam War activism led J. Edgar Hoover and the FBI to monitor his activities and associations.

In 1971 Mass: A Theatre Piece for Singers, Players and Dancers premiered at the Kennedy Center in Washington, DC. It was, according to biographer Humphrey Burton, the closest [Bernstein] ever came to achieving a synthesis between Broadway and the concert hall. The huge cast performed songs in styles ranging from rock to blues to gospel. Mass debuted on Broadway later that year. Later Bernstein compositions include the dance drama, Dybbuk (1974); 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue (1976), a musical about the White House that was a financial and critical disaster; the song cycle Songfest: A Cycle of American Poems for Six Singers and Orchestra (1977); and the opera A Quiet Place (1983, revised 1984). In the 1980s Bernstein continued his hectic schedule of international appearances and social concerns. He gave concerts to mark the fortieth anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima and a benefit for AIDS research. On Christmas Day, 1989, Bernstein led an international orchestra in Berlin, which was in the midst of celebrating the collapse of the Berlin Wall. In a typically grand gesture, Bernstein changed the words of "Ode to Joy" to "Ode to Freedom." Despite health problems, Bernstein continued to tour the world in 1990 before returning to Tanglewood for an August 19th concert. He had first conducted a professional orchestra there in 1940, and this performance, 50 years later, was to be his last. He died in New York of a heart attack brought on by emphysema and other complications.

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Candide, operéta en dos actos (1956, rev. 1989). Fragmento del acto primero.

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Última edición por Zelenka el 24 May 2014 21:04, editado 1 vez en total

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