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Bastante interesante, en fase auditiva :wink:


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Engelbert Humperdinck (1854–1921) He was born at Siegburg, in the Rhine Province. After receiving piano lessons, Humperdinck produced his first composition at the age of seven. His first attempts at works for the stage were two Singspiele when he was 13. His parents did not approve of his becoming a musician, but despite them encouraging him to study architecture, he took music classes at the Cologne Conservatory, which he entered in 1872 under Ferdinand Hiller. In 1876 he won a scholarship which enabled him to go to Munich, where he studied with Franz Paul Lachner and later with Josef Rheinberger. In 1879 he was the first to win the Mendelssohn Award awarded by the Mendelssohn Stiftung of Berlin. He went to Italy, and became acquainted with Richard Wagner in Naples. Wagner invited him to go to Bayreuth, and during 1880–81 Humperdinck assisted in the production of Parsifal. Having won another prize, however, he went again to Southern Europe, traveling through Italy, France and Spain, spending two years in Barcelona teaching at the Gran Teatre del Liceu conservatoire. In 1887 he returned to Cologne, and was appointed professor at the Hoch Conservatory (Frankfurt-am-Main) in 1890, and also teacher of harmony at Julius Stockhausen's Vocal School. By this time he had composed several works for chorus and a Humoreske for orchestra, which enjoyed a vogue in Germany.

His chief reputation rests on his opera Hänsel und Gretel, which was produced at Weimar, 1893. In 1896 the Kaiser made Humperdinck a Professor and he went to live at Boppard. Four years later, however, he went to Berlin where he was appointed head of a Meister-Schule of composition. Among his other stage works are Die sieben Geißlein (1895), Königskinder (1897, 1910), Dornröschen (1902), Die Heirat wider Willen (1905), Bübchens Weihnachtstraum (1906), Die Marketenderin (The Vivandière) (1914), Gaudeamus: Szenen aus dem deutschen Studentenleben (1919). Humperdinck was greatly influenced by Richard Wagner, and worked as his assistant. In his melodrama Die Königskinder (1897), Humperdinck became the first composer to use Sprechgesang, a vocal technique halfway between singing and speaking that was used later by Arnold Schoenberg. In 1914 Humperdinck seems to have applied for the post of director of the New South Wales Conservatorium of Music in Sydney, but with the outbreak of World War I it became unthinkable for a German to hold this position, and the job went instead to Belgium's Henri Verbrugghen. In 1912, Humperdinck suffered a severe stroke. Although he was eventually able to recover, his left hand remained permanently paralyzed. During the summer of 1915, he began to compose what would be his final work for the stage, Gaudeamus, and with the help of his son, Wolfram, it was completed in 1918. In 1921, Humperdinck attended the performance of Wolfram's first production as a director of Carl Maria von Weber's Der Freischütz in Neustrelitz. During the performance he had a heart attack. He died the next day from a second heart attack.

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Königskinder, Märchenoper en tres actos (1897, 1910). Final del acto segundo.

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Última edición por Zelenka el 24 May 2014 20:15, editado 1 vez en total

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Sir Arthur Edward Drummond Bliss (1891-1975) Born to an American father and English mother, Bliss attended Bilton Grange Preparatory School and Rugby before entering Cambridge University. He was destined to display characteristics of both nations, his profound romanticism balanced by an unquenchable energy and optimism. He began studies at the Royal College of Music under Charles Villiers Stanford, but First World War broke out shortly after his first term and he left school to serve as a Grenadier Guards officer in the field. With the return of peace, Bliss’s career took off rapidly as a composer of what were, for British audiences, startlingly new pieces, often for unusual ensembles. Among these are a Concerto for wordless tenor voice, piano and strings, and Rout for soprano and chamber orchestra, in which the soloist sings phonetic sounds rather than words. Much of his early music shows the influence of Stravinsky and Debussy. A landmark was his A Colour Symphony of 1922 which explores the idea of the musical associations of different colours.

From the late 1920s onwards Bliss moved more into the traditional English musical scene with choral works such as Pastoral and Morning Heroes; in the 1930s he wrote the music for the film Things to Come and the ballet Checkmate. Bliss was always an ambitious, prolific composer, and some of his works were clearly intended for a wider international audience than they actually received. The Introduction and Allegro and the Piano Concerto are examples, the concerto being premiered by Solomon at the 1939 New York World's Fair. During the Second World War Bliss became Director of Music at the BBC, and formed ideas which led to the division of music broadcasting into categories after the war, such as the present day Radios 1 and 3. In 1950 he was knighted and in 1953 he was appointed to succeed Arnold Bax as Master of the Queen's Musick. By this point in his career, though, it was becoming apparent that Bliss had not attained the level of success he had been aiming for. His opera The Olympians, despite a full-scale production at Covent Garden, was not popular, his oratorio The Beatitudes was forgotten beside Benjamin Britten's War Requiem at the 1962 Coventry Festival, and his Cello Concerto, written for the Russian cellist Mstislav Rostropovich, was overshadowed by those of Benjamin Britten, Henri Dutilleux and Witold Lutosławski. Bliss recorded fine interpretations of several of his major works, but they were not taken up widely by other conductors. His swansong, Metamorphic Variations, a large orchestral work, was first performed in 1972, but not by Leopold Stokowski as Bliss had hoped.

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The Olympians, ópera en tres actos (1948-1949). Fragmento del acto primero.

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Última edición por Zelenka el 24 May 2014 20:18, editado 3 veces en total

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Interesante fragmento, la pongo en busca y captura.


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José Melchor Baltasar Gaspar Nebra Blasco (1702-1768). Nació en Calatayud. Miembro de una familia de músicos, recibió sus primeras enseñanzas de su padre José Antonio Nebra Mezquita afincado en Cuenca, de cuya Catedral fue organista y profesor de los infantes de Coro (1711-1729) y posteriormente Maestro de Capilla (1729- 1748). Sus dos hermanos también fueron músicos: Francisco Javier fue organista en La Seo de Zaragoza (1727- 1729) y luego en Cuenca (1729-1741). Joaquín Nebra fue organista de La Seo de Zaragoza desde 1730 hasta su muerte. José de Nebra se traslada pronto a Madrid, donde desarrollará toda su carrera. En 1719 es mencionado como organista del convento de las Descalzas Reales, donde coincidió con el maestro de capilla José de San Juan, autor de Arte de Canto Llano... (Madrid, 1694) y en 1722 está trabajando para la capilla nobiliaria de la Casa de Osuna, junto a compositores como Antonio Literes y Antonio Duni. En esta misma época (1723) comienza a componer música escénica para los teatros comerciales de la ciudad. En 1724 Nebra es nombrado organista de la Capilla Real. Ocupa una de las vacantes dejadas por los músicos que acompañan al rey Felipe V en su retiro a San Ildefonso tras renunciar al trono en favor de su hijo Luis I. Con la prematura muerte del nuevo rey y la vuelta al trono de Felipe V con la Capilla desplazada a San Ildefonso, Nebra pasó a ser supernumerario.

En 1751, ocupa la nueva plaza de Vicemaestro de la Capilla Real y Vicerrector del Colegio de Niños Cantores. El incendio del Alcázar en 1734 por un lado, y los importantes cambios experimentados en la plantilla instrumental de la Capilla por otro, motivaron la necesidad de nuevo y abundante repertorio para cubrir las necesidades del culto. Por voluntad del nuevo rey Fernando VI se crea el Archivo de Música de la Capilla Real, de cuya organización se encargará directamente a Nebra. Francesco Corseli desde su ascenso al Magisterio de la Capilla (1738) había ido componiendo obras propias y adquiriendo otras de José de Torres y de Felipe Falconi, la mayoría de las cuales son compradas por la Corona para aumentar los fondos del Archivo. Aparte de obras de autores españoles (la mayoría sin el adecuado acompañamiento instrumental) Nebra propone la adquisición de obras de compositores italianos napolitanos (A. Scarlatti, Leo, Sarro, Farantino). Él mismo, abandonando casi por completo su actividad teatral, inicia un período de intensa dedicación a la música religiosa, cuyos frutos, en su mayoría, aún se conservan en el archivo del Palacio Real de Madrid. Elogiado como excepcional intérprete de órgano, en 1749 se le encomienda que supervise las obras de reparación del órgano del Convento de los Jerónimos, y en 1756 se le pide opinión sobre el proyecto del instrumento que se estaba construyendo para la capilla del nuevo Palacio Real (con autoría de Fernández Dávila).

Como intérprete de teclado, Nebra desarrolló una labor docente en distintos ámbitos, así fue profesor de órgano en el convento de Jerónimos de Madrid, contándose entre sus alumnos a Domingo de Santiago (1707-1757), José del Valle († 1743), Manuel del Valle, y el padre Antonio Soler (1729-1783), al que prologó su libro Llave de la modulación (Madrid, 1762). En el Colegio de Cantorcicos de Madrid impartió clases de órgano y composición a José Lidón (1748-1827), más tarde organista y Maestro en la Capilla Real. En la Corte, durante el reinado de Carlos III fue nombrado maestro de clave del infante Don Gabriel (1761), con obligación de acompañarle en sus desplazamientos a los Reales Sitios, asistiendo con frecuencia a las veladas musicales en su cámara. También fue discípulo suyo (1766-1768) su sobrino Manuel Blasco de Nebra (1750-1784) organista en la Catedral de Sevilla que publicó en Madrid, Seis sonatas para clave, y fuerte piano (Madrid, c. 1775) En 1726, y con motivo de la polémica suscitada por el P. Feijoo con su Discurso, Música en los Templos, incluido en el primer volumen del Teatro Crítico (Madrid, 1726) en el que atacaba la introducción de los violines en la música religiosa, Juan Francisco Corominas, violinista de la Universidad de Salamanca publica una respuesta contra tales argumentos —Aposento Anti-Crítico (Salamanca, 1726)— en la que entre a otros compositores españoles contemporáneos (Literes, José de Torres, José de San Juan, Sequeira) se cita a José de Nebra como exponente de la mejor música que se está haciendo en ese momento en España, utilizando los recursos instrumentales y estilísticos de origen italiano.

Buena muestra de ello es el que sea elegido en 1728, junto a los italianos Facco y Falconi para componer la música del melodrama Amor aumenta el valor con motivo de los festejos celebrados en Lisboa a raíz del casamiento del Príncipe de Asturias (futuro Fernando VI) y la princesa portuguesa María Bárbara de Braganza. Pero su prestigio como músico teatral se cimentará en sus trabajos para los escenarios públicos de Madrid donde colaboró con los principales dramaturgos del momento (Cañizares, González Martínez) y fue el encargado de inaugurar los nuevos coliseos que sustituyeron a los tradicionales corrales. Más gloria es triunfar de sí. Adriano en Siria, abría en el Coliseo de la Cruz la primera temporada de ópera a cargo de compañías españolas, y en 1745, Cautelas contra cautelas y el rapto de Ganímedes inaugura el nuevo Coliseo del Príncipe. De forma continuada desde 1723 hasta 1751, si exceptuamos los años 1731 a 1736, Nebra compone música para los géneros con mayor participación musical del momento. En estas obras, donde se alternan con gran fluidez las partes declamadas y las cantadas Nebra utiliza formas musicales de la tradición española (Coros a 4, Seguidillas, Estribillos-Coplas), junto a otras provenientes de la ópera italiana contemporánea (Recitativos, Arias da Capo), empleando con frecuencia tríos y cuartetos (Arias a 3 o a 4) con estructura da capo, para terminar las distintas jornadas (Actos) de las zarzuelas. Pese a su éxito continuado como compositor teatral en el ámbito de los teatros públicos, la participación de Nebra en los espectáculos de la Corte fue bastante restringida, al margen de su colaboración en 1728 en Lisboa.

Con posterioridad, y en un entorno cada vez más proclive a la programación de óperas compuestas e interpretadas por italianos, sólo conocemos su participación al clave en algunas de las óperas representadas en la Corte madrileña: Farnace (1738) y Achille in Sciro (1744) ambas con música de Corseli. También queda constancia de puntuales arreglos instrumentales y añadidos para dos comedias de Calderón y Cañizares repuestas con motivo de la boda de la Infanta María Luisa con el Gran Duque de Toscana en 1764. En cuanto a su producción religiosa, aunque iniciada en 1747, se incrementa notablemente a partir de 1751, cuando es nombrado Vicemaestro de la Real Capilla, con obras expresamente pensadas para las necesidades y plantilla de dicha institución (coro a 8 voces y amplio conjunto instrumental), muchas de las cuales se conservan aún hay en el Archivo del Palacio Real. Compone obras también para la catedral de Cuenca con la que mantiene vínculos familiares, y envía obras a Santiago de Compostela, y La Seo de Zaragoza, conservándose copias de sus obras religiosas en diferentes archivos españoles e iberoamericanos. En 1758 compone un Requiem con motivo del fallecimiento de la reina María Bárbara, obra que se asociará a los funerales de la familia real española hasta entrado el siglo XIX (Fernando VI, María Amalia de Sajonia, Carlos III y Fernando VII). En 1759 envió sus Vísperas del común de los Santos y de la Virgen al Papa Clemente XIII para que se interpretasen en la Capilla Pontificia. A partir de 1761, coincidiendo con el reinado de Carlos III y sus deberes como maestro del infante Gabriel, decrece su producción religiosa, con obras más breves y arreglos de otras para acortarlas. Su prestigio como compositor y organista motivó el que se le ofrecieran el magisterio de Capilla de la Catedral de Santiago de Compostela (1738) y el puesto de organista en Cuenca (1741), destinos que él rechazó, permaneciendo durante toda su carrera en Madrid. Esto le permitió el acceso a las instituciones de mayor prestigio —Capilla Real—, y al mercado teatral comercial más activo y estable de España, donde se convirtió en el compositor español más importante de mediados del siglo XVIII.

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Viento es la dicha de amor, zarzuela en dos actos (1743). Aria, Teme aleve fementido. Aria, Guerra publique, guerra.

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Última edición por Zelenka el 24 May 2014 21:54, editado 2 veces en total

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Ferenc Erkel (1810-1893). He was born in Gyula, Hungary. His father was the Kantorlehrer Franz Erkl. His ancestors came from Cologne. He studied music in Großwardein and Pressburg. He played and taught the piano in Kolozsvár, then settled in the capital c1835, conducting opera, appearing as a piano soloist and composing instrumental pieces with Hungarian themes (e.g. the Duo brillant for violin and piano, 1837). He decided not to compete with Liszt as a pianist but turned to writing for the stage: his well-received Bátori Mária (1840) led quickly to Hunyadi László (1844), the most successful of his operas in Hungary; it combines Italian and Viennese Classical influences with indigenous ones, notably the ‘Hungarian scale’, rhythms, heroic expression and tripartite form of the verbunkos, and the dramatic climaxes of the csárdás.

He was conductor at the National Theatre, Pest (1838-74; succeeded by Hans Richter), and for the Philharmonic Concerts which he founded, composing mainly shorter works from this time onwards, including the well-known népszínmű (popular plays with interpolated songs) Két pisztoly and A rab and the Hungarian national anthem (1844). His strikingly successful Bánk bán (1861), written with his most talented sons Gyula (1842-1909) and Sándor (1846-1900), represents the culmination of his native operatic style. Neither his later comic works nor his experimental, nationalistic music dramas were as distinctive, though the Wagnerian Brankovics György (1868-72) was considered his masterpiece during his lifetime. He devoted his last years to choral music and the directorship of the Budapest Academy of Music.

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Hunyadi László, ópera en tres actos (1841–1843). Coro del acto primero, Nem leszünk mi hú kutyái. Aria del acto segundo, Hosszú az éj Én, bábja vad kezeknek Ég kincse, drága, szép Mária!.

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Bánk Bán, ópera en tres actos (1851–1860). Fragmento del acto primero.

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Última edición por Zelenka el 26 May 2014 9:31, editado 3 veces en total

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MARAVILLOSA

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De esta ópera no hay una peli con Eva Marton y Andrea Rost?


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Viento es la dicha de amor (1743) Zarzuela en dos actos.
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Es una obra bellísima, que tuve la suerte de ver en teatro. Maravillosa :besucon:

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Alessandro Scarlatti (1660-1725). He was born in Palermo, then part of the Kingdom of Sicily. When he was 12 he was sent to Rome, where he may have studied with Carissimi. He married in 1678 and later that year was appointed maestro di cappella of San Giacomo degli Incurabili (now 'in Augusta'). By then he had already composed at least one opera (the title is unknown and it was not performed) and a second, Gli equivoci nel sembiante, was a resounding success in 1679. It confirmed Scarlatti in his chosen career as an opera composer and attracted the attention of Queen Christina of Sweden, who made him her maestro di cappella. In 1684 Scarlatti was appointed maestro di cappella at the vice-regal court of Naples, at the same time as his brother Francesco was made first violinist. It was alleged that they owed their appointments to the intrigues of one of their sisters (apparently Melchiorra) with two court officials, who were dismissed.

For the next two decades over half the new operas given at Naples were by Scarlatti. Two of them, Il Pirro e Demetrio (1694) and La caduta dei Decemviri (1697), were especially successful, but by 1700 the War of the Spanish Succession was beginning to undermine the privileged status of the Neapolitan nobility, rendering Scarlatti's position insecure. In 1702 he left with his family for Florence, where he hoped to find employment for himself and his son Domenico with Prince Ferdinando de' Medici. When these hopes failed, Scarlatti accepted the inferior position in Rome of assistant music director at San Maria Maggiore. With a papal ban on public opera, he found an outlet for his talents in oratorio and in writing cantatas for his Roman patrons, notably Prince Ruspoli and the cardinals Ottoboni and Pamphili. In 1706 he was elected to the Arcadian Academy, with Pasquini and Corelli. The following year he attempted to conquer Venice, the citadel of Italian opera, with Mitridate Eupatore and Il trionfo della libertà, but they both failed and Scarlatti was forced to return to Rome, where he was promoted to the senior post at San Maria Maggiore.

Scarlatti found little satisfaction in the life of a church musician, and towards the end of 1708 he accepted an invitation from the new Austrian viceroy to resume his position at Naples. He remained there for the rest of his life, but maintained close contacts with his Roman patrons and made several visits there, some of them of long duration. It was probably in 1715 that he received a patent of nobility from Pope Clement XI. His final opera, La Griselda, was written for Rome in 1721, and he seems to have spent his last years in Naples in semi-retirement. Quantz visited him in 1724 and Hasse was his pupil for a time. Scarlatti's reputation as the founder of the Neapolitan school of 18th-century opera has been exaggerated. He was not influential or even very active as a teacher, nor was he the sole originator of the musical structures (da capo aria, Italian overture, accompanied recitative) with which his name is associated, though he did bring to these a level of skill and originality which surpassed those of his contemporaries. Some of his best music is in the chamber cantatas, too few of which are known today.

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La Griselda, dramma per musica en tres actos (1721). Aria Vorresti col tuo pianto. Aria Se il mio dolor t'offrende.

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Última edición por Zelenka el 24 May 2014 20:39, editado 2 veces en total

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Franz Schmidt (1874–1939) He was born in Pressburg, in the Austro-Hungarian Empire (this is now Bratislava, Slovakia). His earliest teacher was his mother, an accomplished pianist, who gave him a systematic instruction in the keyboard works of J. S. Bach. He received a thorough foundation in theory from brother Felizian Moczik, the outstanding organist at the Franciscan church in Pressburg. He studied piano briefly with Theodor Leschetizky, with whom he clashed. He moved to Vienna with his family in 1888, and studied at the Conservatory there (composition with Robert Fuchs, cello with Ferdinand Hellmesberger and theory (the counterpoint class) with Anton Bruckner), graduating "with excellence" in 1896.

He beat 13 other applicants in obtaining a post as cellist with the Vienna Court Opera Orchestra, with whom he played, often under Mahler, until 1914. Mahler habitually had all the cello solos played by Schmidt, even though Friedrich Buxbaum was actually the principal cellist. Schmidt was also in demand as a chamber musician, playing in the string quartet led by Arnold Schoenberg’s close friend Oskar Adler, who also became Schmidt’s doctor: Schmidt and Schoenberg maintained cordial relations despite their vast differences in style. In 1914 he took up a professorship (in piano) at the State Academy of Music (today: University for Music and Representational Art). In 1925 he became Director of the Academy, and from 1927 to 1931 Rector.

As teacher for piano, cello, counterpoint and composition at the Academy he trained numerous musicians, conductors and composers who later became famous. Among his best-known students are above all the pianist Friedrich Wührer and Alfred Rosé (son of Arnold Rosé, the broughtlegendary founder of the Rosé Quartet, Konzertmeister of the Vienna Philharmonic and brother-in-law of Gustav Mahler). Among the composers should be mentioned Theodor Berger, Marcel Rubin and Alfred Uhl. He received many tokens of the high esteem in which he was held, above all the Franz-Josef Order, and an Honorary Doctorate from the University of Vienna.

Schmidt's private life was in stark contrast to the success of his distinguished professional career, and was overshadowed by tragedy. His first wife was, from 1919, confined in the Vienna mental hospital Am Steinhof, and three years after his death was murdered under the Nazi euthanasia laws. His daughter Emma died completely unexpectedly after the birth of her first child. Schmidt experienced a spiritual and physical breakdown after this, but achieved an artistic revival and resolution in his Fourth Symphony of 1933 (which he inscribed as Requiem for my Daughter) and, especially, in his oratorio Das Buch mit sieben Siegeln . His second marriage, to a successful young piano student, for the first time brought some desperately-needed stability into the private life of the artist, who was plagued by many serious health problems.

Schmidt's worsening health forced his retirement from the Academy in early 1937. In the last year of his life Austria was brought into the German Reich by the Anschluss, and Schmidt was fêted by the Nazi authorities as the greatest living composer of the so-called Ostmark. He was given a commission to write a cantata entitled Deutsche Auferstehung which, after 1945, was taken by many as a reason to brand him as having been tainted by Nazi sympathy. However, Schmidt left this composition unfinished, and in summer and autumn 1938, a few months before his death, set it aside to devote himself to two other commissioned works for the one-armed pianist Paul Wittgenstein (brother of the philosopher Ludwig), for whom he had often composed: the Clarinet Quintet in A major and the solo Toccata in d minor.

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Notre Dame, ópera en dos actos (1902-1904). Comienzo del acto primero.

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Última edición por Zelenka el 24 May 2014 20:42, editado 2 veces en total

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Espero conseguir esa grabación algún día.
El Intermedio es maravilloso!


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Fredrik Pacius (1809-1891) He was born in Hamburg, Germany. Pacius studied composition and the violin in his native Germany. He went on to join the Court Orchestra in Stockholm and finally became teacher of music at the University of Helsinki (1835-69). In Helsinki, he combined and improved the budding musical life of the city, conducted choirs and orchestras and organized hundreds of concerts on a grand scale. The title of 'Father of Finnish Music' bestowed on him is no exaggeration in view of his accomplishments. Not only was he a teacher and a performer, he was also a composer and a poet. The premiere production of the opera Kaarle kuninkaan metsstys in 1852 was a milestone in the history of Finnish music: it was the first grand opera written in Finland, even if the libretto by Topelius was in Swedish. A Finnish translation was provided by Jalmari Finne at the turn of the century. Pacius was thoroughly grounded in German Romanticism, which he continued to uphold in his later works for the stage, Kypron prinsessa and Loreley. Pacius also contributed to national sentiments in Finland through his settings of poems by the national poet Runeberg, including Maamme (Our land), today Finland's national anthem, Suomen laulu (Finland's song) and Sotilaspoika (Soldier boy).

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Kung Karls Jakt, ópera en tres actos (1852-1879). Fragmento del acto primero.

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Loreley, ópera en dos actos (1862-1887). Fragmento del acto primero.

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Última edición por Zelenka el 24 May 2014 20:46, editado 2 veces en total

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Joseph Guy Marie Ropartz (1864-1955) Ropartz was born in Guingamp, Côtes-d'Armor, Brittany. As a child, he played bugle, horn, and double bass in a local orchestra, but his father desired him to prepare himself for life in a more secure profession. Therefore, he was given a Jesuit education, then studied law and literature, obtaining a degree from Rennes in 1885. Having thus satisfied his father's wishes that he prepare himself for profession, Ropartz then enrolled at the Paris Conservatoire. His early training in composition was with Theodore Dubois, then with Jules Massenet, where became a close friend of the young Georges Enesco. He also wrote poetry at the time. In 1886, Ropartz heard the composition Le chant de la cloche by Vincent d'Indy, a leading disciple of the Belgian-born composer César Franck. Highly impressed, Ropartz left the Conservatoire to study with Franck. He adopted elements of Franck's individual use of chromatic harmony and, even more important to Ropartz' music, Franck's use of cyclic forms. The influence of d'Indy and Franck is evident in his first orchestral work, La Cloche des morts. His next few works then began to show the literary, pictorial, and folk influence of Brittany, the northwest French region that was his native province, and were well received.

In 1894, he accepted an invitation to become the director of the Nancy Conservatory. Henceforth, he made his career outside Paris, the musical center of the country. Because of this, he remained less well known and continued composing in his habitual style, outside the mainstream of the historical development of twentieth century styles. At the time, he was the youngest conservatory director in France, but his directorship of the Nancy Conservatory was a brilliant success. It became one of the leading regional music training institutions in the country. Conducting and presenting serious and penetrating readings were among his talents. After 25 years in Nancy, he accepted an invitation in 1919 to take a similar job in Strasbourg, in addition to taking the helm of the local symphony. Strasbourg, the capital of Alsace-Lorraine, had just been recovered from Germany, which had occupied it from the Franco-Prussian War in 1871 to the end of the First World War. Ropartz' task was to promote French music there, to bring the region and the conservatory back into French musical life. Again, he was highly successful. In 1929, at the age of 65, he retired from his positions and returned to his native Brittany.

He lived to be 91 and wrote about 200 works during this long life. His last large-scale work was his String Quartet, composed in 1951. He wrote five symphonies, other orchestral music, chamber music, choral music, stage music, and an opera, Le Pays, premiered in Nancy in 1912 and later heard in Paris. Late in life he changed his surname to "Guy-Ropartz." His music was always well regarded for its logic, clarity, and lack of excessive material. Ropartz enjoyed a lifespan that cut across an enormous territory of French music; when he was born, Jacques Offenbach had just premiered La belle Hélène and the year he died, Henri Dutilleux rolled out his second symphony. Ropartz also achieved an astounding rite of passage in his own work, starting out deep inside the Franck school, but also embracing impressionist language and ultimately emerging the as the chief tone poet of his native region, Brittany; late in life Guy Ropartz flirted with neo-classicism.

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Le Pays, drama en música en tres actos (1912), cuatro cuadros. Escena segunda del acto segundo.

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Última edición por Zelenka el 24 May 2014 20:51, editado 3 veces en total

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Joseph Guy Marie Ropartz (1870-1909) Ropartz was born in Guingamp, Côtes-d'Armor, Brittany. As a child, he played bugle, horn, and double bass in a local orchestra, but his father desired him to prepare himself for life in a more secure profession. Therefore, he was given a Jesuit education, then studied law and literature, obtaining a degree from Rennes in 1885. Having thus satisfied his father's wishes that he prepare himself for profession, Ropartz then enrolled at the Paris Conservatoire. His early training in composition was with Theodore Dubois, then with Jules Massenet, where became a close friend of the young Georges Enesco. He also wrote poetry at the time. In 1886, Ropartz heard the composition Le chant de la cloche by Vincent d'Indy, a leading disciple of the Belgian-born composer César Franck. Highly impressed, Ropartz left the Conservatoire to study with Franck. He adopted elements of Franck's individual use of chromatic harmony and, even more important to Ropartz' music, Franck's use of cyclic forms. The influence of d'Indy and Franck is evident in his first orchestral work, La Cloche des morts. His next few works then began to show the literary, pictorial, and folk influence of Brittany, the northwest French region that was his native province, and were well received.

In 1894, he accepted an invitation to become the director of the Nancy Conservatory. Henceforth, he made his career outside Paris, the musical center of the country. Because of this, he remained less well known and continued composing in his habitual style, outside the mainstream of the historical development of twentieth century styles. At the time, he was the youngest conservatory director in France, but his directorship of the Nancy Conservatory was a brilliant success. It became one of the leading regional music training institutions in the country. Conducting and presenting serious and penetrating readings were among his talents. After 25 years in Nancy, he accepted an invitation in 1919 to take a similar job in Strasbourg, in addition to taking the helm of the local symphony. Strasbourg, the capital of Alsace-Lorraine, had just been recovered from Germany, which had occupied it from the Franco-Prussian War in 1871 to the end of the First World War. Ropartz' task was to promote French music there, to bring the region and the conservatory back into French musical life. Again, he was highly successful. In 1929, at the age of 65, he retired from his positions and returned to his native Brittany.

He lived to be 91 and wrote about 200 works during this long life. His last large-scale work was his String Quartet, composed in 1951. He wrote five symphonies, other orchestral music, chamber music, choral music, stage music, and an opera, Le Pays, premiered in Nancy in 1912 and later heard in Paris. Late in life he changed his surname to "Guy-Ropartz." His music was always well regarded for its logic, clarity, and lack of excessive material. Ropartz enjoyed a lifespan that cut across an enormous territory of French music; when he was born, Jacques Offenbach had just premiered La belle Hélène and the year he died, Henri Dutilleux rolled out his second symphony. Ropartz also achieved an astounding rite of passage in his own work, starting out deep inside the Franck school, but also embracing impressionist language and ultimately emerging the as the chief tone poet of his native region, Brittany; late in life Guy Ropartz flirted with neo-classicism.

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Le Pays (1912) Drama en música en tres actos y cuatro cuadros. Escena segunda del acto segundo.

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¿39 años el tío de la foto? :?: :?: :?: :?: :?: :?: :?: :?: :?: :?:


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Según Wikipedia: "Joseph Guy Ropartz (June 15, 1864 – November 22, 1955)" :?

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