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Luigi Dallapiccola (1904–1975) He was born at Pisino d'Istria (current Pazin, Croatia), to Italian parents. Unlike many composers born into highly musical environments, his early musical career was irregular at best. Political disputes over his birthplace of Istria, then part of the Austrian empire, led to instability and frequent moves. His father was headmaster of an Italian - language school – the only one in the city – which was shut down at the start of World War I. The family, considered politically subversive, was placed in internment at Graz, Austria, where the budding composer hadn't even access to a piano, though he did attend performances at the local opera house (Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's Don Giovanni and Richard Wagner's Die Meistersinger and The Flying Dutchman) which cemented his desire to pursue composition as a career. Once back to his hometown Pisino after the war, he travelled frequently. He studied with Antonio Illersberg in Trieste (1920-22): Debussy and early Italian music (Monteverdi, Gesualdo) became important influences.

At the Florence Conservatory he studied composition with Casiraghi (1923-4) and Frazzi (1929-31), and he took his piano degree in the 1920s and became professor there in 1931; until his 1967 retirement he spent his career there teaching lessons in piano as a secondary instrument, replacing his teacher Ernesto Consolo as the older man's illness prevented him from continuing. In his early works Dallapiccola did not follow twelve-tone principles. However, he came to feel that the consistent use of the twelve tones would enable him to write richer and more expressive melodies. A fine example of such a melody occurs at the beginning of his opera Volo di notte (1937-1939). Canti di prigionia (1939-1941) are united by a single twelve-tone row but still contain many free passages. His first work to use the strict twelve-tone method throughout is the Cinque frammenti di Saffo (1942). Dallapiccola was the first Italian composer to study and apply twelve-tone principles systematically. In applying them he also found his personal style. While he learned much from the example of Arnold Schoenberg, Alban Berg, and Anton Webern, Dallapiccola's expressiveness is his own.

Dallapiccola's early experiences under the fascist regime of Benito Mussolini would color his outlook and output for the rest of his life. He once supported Mussolini, believing the propaganda, and it was not until the 1930s that he would become passionate about his political views, in protest to the Abyssinian campaign and Italy's involvement in the Spanish Civil War. Mussolini's sympathy with Adolf Hitler's views on race, which threatened his Jewish wife Laura Luzzatto, only hardened his stance. Canti di prigionia and Il prigioniero are reflections of this impassioned concern; the former was his first true protest work. During World War II he was in the dangerous position of opposing the Nazis; though he tried to go about his career as usual, and did, to a limited extent. On two occasions he was forced to go into hiding for several months. Dallapiccola would continue his touring as a recitalist – but only in countries not occupied by the Nazis.

Though it was only after the war that his compositions made it into the public eye (with his opera Il prigioniero sparking his fame), it was then that his life would be relatively quiet. He made frequent travels to the United States, including appearances at Tanglewood in the summers of 1951 and 1952 and several semesters of teaching courses in composition at Queens College, New York beginning in 1956. He was a sought-after lecturer throughout Western Europe and the Americas. Dallapiccola's 1968 opera Ulisse would be the peak of his career, after which his compositional output would be sparse; his later years were largely spent writing essays rather than music. He had no more finished compositions after 1972 due to his failing health, until he died in Florence in 1975 of edema of the lungs; however, there are a very few sketches and fragments of work from this time, including a vocal work left unfinished just hours before his death.

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Il prigioniero, opera en un prólogo y un acto (1944-1948). Comienzo.

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Ulisse, opera en un prólogo y dos actos (1960-1968). Comienzo del acto primero.

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Última edición por Zelenka el 24 May 2014 13:05, editado 1 vez en total

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Aprovechando que está de moda en el foro 8)

El fragmento de Ulisse es cortesía de Lenz :wink:


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Jo Kondo (*1947) He was born in Tokyo, Japan. Kondo graduated from the composition department of Tokyo University of Arts in 1972. He spent a year in New York on a scholarship from the John D. Rockefeller III Fund in 1977-78. In 1979 he taught as guest lecturer at University of Victoria, British Columbia, invited by the Canada Council, and in 1986 resided in London as a British Council Senior Fellow. In 1987 he was composer in residence at Hartt School of Music, Hartford, Connecticut, USA, and taught at Dartington International Summer School in England. At present he is Professor of Music at Ochanomizu University in Tokyo, and also teaches at Tokyo University of Arts and Elisabeth University of Music in Hiroshima. In 1980 Kondo founded the Musica Practica Ensemble, a chamber orchestra devoted to contemporary music, and was artistic director of the group until its disbandment in 1991.

He has written more than eighty compositions, ranging from solo pieces to orchestral and electronic works, which have been widely performed in Japan, North America and Europe and recorded on Hat Art, ALM, Fontec Deutsche Grammophon and other labels. He has received commissions from numerous organisations, and his music has been featured at many international music festivals. Performers associated with his music include the conductor Tadaaki Otaka, the pianist Aki Takahashi, the Ives and Nieuw Ensembles in the Netherlands, the London Sinfonietta and many others. Kondo has written extensively on musical matters, and since 1979 he has published four books spelling out in detail his own aesthetic and compositional ideas. He is also an associate editor of Contemporary Music Review. During 2000 he directed the composition classes at the Dartington International School of Music and was on the jury of the Gaudeamus International Composer's competition, and was a featured composer at the 2005 Huddersfield Contemporary Music Festival.

Each sound must have its own entity and life. What I am doing in my compositions is to create a web of intertonal relationships, while trying to safeguard the possibility of aurally perceiving the individual entity and life of every single tone in that relationship.

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Hagoromo, ópera en un acto (1994). Fragmento.

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Última edición por Zelenka el 24 May 2014 13:08, editado 2 veces en total

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¿Por qué este hilo siempre está en inglés? Supongo, como todo el mundo, que estará copiado de alguna parte, ¿no?

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Al final de cada texto está la fuente. No tengo la culpa de que se consiga información mas completa y mas facil en inglés que en espagnol :?

Con decirte que para una futura vigneta de un compositor espagnol encontré mas en inglés que en espagnol :roll:


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Aclarado. Gracias y ánimo.

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Acabo de terminar con la escucha de Hagoromo (la ópera entera, no solamente el fragmento). Me ha gustado especialmente el juego entre la flauta y la voz, así como esa manera de crear pequeñas estructuras, autocontenidas, que se van ensamblando para formar la ópera. Interesante.


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(Alexis-) Emmanuel Chabrier (1841–1894) He was born in Ambert (Puy-de-Dôme), a town in the Auvergne region of central France. As early as age 6, Chabrier began piano lessons under the tutelage of a Spanish refugee named Saporta. At 10, he attended the Lycée Impérial at Clermont Ferrand, where he continued his keyboard studies and began to try his hand at composition. Upon the insistence of his father, however, he relegated music to be his pastime; after two years in Paris at the Lycée Louis le Grand (or the Lycée Saint Louis - biographers disagree on which is the case), he began to study law. He continued also to take piano lessons and studied counterpoint and fugue, but when he took his law degree in 1862, he went to work for the Ministry of the Interior, where he worked for 18 years. During this time, he associated with the painter Manet and fellow musicians including Duparc, d'Indy, Fauré, and Messager. During the Franco-Prussian War (1870–1871), Chabrier fought for France, after which, he returned to his desk job. In 1873, he married Marie Alice Dejean with whom he had two sons. While he was employed by the government, Chabrier wrote several compositions that he offered to publishers. His interest in poetry lead to a friendship with Paul Verlaine, who contributed librettos to two early operettas that he did not complete. His first work for the stage, L'étoile, achieved 48 successful performances at the Bouffes Parisien in 1877, showcasing his light touch, musical aplomb, and comic wit.

In 1879, he made his first visit to Germany in the company of Duparc; a performance of Wagner's Tristan und Isolde in Munich so moved him that he determined to quit the law and devote his life to music. He returned to Paris, resigned from the Ministry in 1880 - just two months before his 40th birthday - and began to spend his days composing. Before this monumental step, Chabrier had produced only two significant works, these being the operettas L'Étoile (1877) and Une Éducation manquée (1879); however, now freed of his routine job, he produced in short order Dix Pièces pittoresques for piano (1881), Habanera (1885), and Bourrée fantasque in 1891. His finest short work, the brilliant España Rhapsody, came forth in 1883; this piece alone established Chabrier as a composer of serious merit. His Idylle from Pièces pittoresques greatly influenced Francis Poulenc, who wrote in his book Emmanuel Chabrier, Even today I tremble with emotion in thinking of the miracle that was produced: a harmonic universe suddenly opened in front of me, and my music has never forgotten this first loving kiss (Ivry, 1996). In the years 1884 and 1885 he worked as chorus master at the Château d'Eau where, among other projects, he assisted with a production of Wagner's Tristan. This close association with Wagner's music both developed his skill in orchestration and instilled in him some elements of Germanic style; in later years, these elements would appear in his own works, much to his own consternation and that of his musical compatriots in France.

His opera Gwendoline, set in the England during the Middle Ages, was a success at its premier in Brussels in 1885, but it closed after just two performance because the impresario went bankrupt. Similar bad luck haunted the premier of Le roi malgré lui two years later when the Opéra Comique in Paris burned after the third performance. Still a rather old-fashioned work, in which sung portions were interspersed with stretches of dialogue, it was rebuffed by modernists; it was nonetheless considered spirited and delightfully original. Fortunately, theater directors in Leipzig and Munich expressed interest in both works and Chabrier made several happy trips to Germany as a result. In his final years, Chabrier was strained by financial issues, and suffered from failing health and depression about the small success his stage works had achieved in France. He became obsessed with the composition of his opera Briséïs, which was inspired by a tragedy of Goethe and melodic echos of Wagner, but completed only one act. The Paris premiere of Gwendoline, which finally arrived in 1893, provided little consolation. He succumbed to general paralysis in the last year of his life, dying in Paris at age 53. Considering his very late start and lack of substantial formal training, Chabrier must be regarded as brilliant. His music is extremely colorful, and he was particularly adept at integrating forces and resources to create a unified sound world. Not so much a dramatist as a lyricist, Chabrier seemed most comfortable writing in the realm of comedy; evidently this is an accurate reflection of his personality in general. He was a fundamental influence on Les Six, the group of young French composers who typified the emerging French nationalism in the generation following him; they took him as a model, stopping short of his later Wagnerian turn. He also heavily influenced the work of Maurice Ravel. When viewed in the context of his relatively short career, Chabrier's output indeed labels him as an overachiever.

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Fisch-Ton-Kan,, opereta en un acto (1863-1964). Fragmento.

Vaucochard et fils Lers, opereta (incompleta) (1864). Fragmento.

Une éducation manquée, opereta en un acto (1879) Fragmento.

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L'étoile, ópera bufa en tres actos (1877). Fragmento del acto segundo.

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Gwendoline, ópera en dos actos (1885). Fragmento del acto segundo.

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Le roi malgré lui, ópera cómica en tres actos (1887). Chanson tzigane.

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Briséïs, ópera (1888-1891). Fragmento.

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Última edición por Zelenka el 24 May 2014 13:17, editado 1 vez en total

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Ya falta menos para que me pueda poner al día con este hilo :D


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Gerald Barry (*1952) He was born in Clarecastle, County Clare, Republic of Ireland. He studied composition with Stockhausen and Kagel, and organ with Piet Kee. His music is notable for its inherent use of real thematic development. Although, paradoxically, Barry's music shifts between blocks of thematic material, often without any reason or preparation. He first came to public attention in 1979 with his radical ensemble works "__________" and "Ø", ending in unexpected places and shifting from avant-garde styles to rhythms reminiscent of Irish folk music. His operatic style seems to be modelled on that of G.F. Handel and his theatrical gestures often embrace sexual and erotic themes in grotesque or bombastic ways. Quite often the structure of Gerald Barry's music happens at a medium-high level, such that long streams of similar durations and dynamics switch suddenly to a different type as though changing gear, with the pathos being in the contrast and in the micro-resemblances of harmonic/melodic material across the boundaries of these contrasting regions. Like Handel and Mozart he often conceives of material independently of its instrumental medium, recycling ideas from piece to piece as in the reworking of Triorchic Blues from a violin to piano piece. He is a particular specialist in writing for the bass voice; The Conquest of Ireland and Beethoven - his latest work setting some of the letters of Beethoven to his 'Immortal beloved'. Barry's word-settings are particular and could be described as somewhat revolutionary in gesture.

Wikipedia

The Triumph of Beauty and Deceit, ópera para televisión en dos actos (1991-1992). Comienzo.

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Última edición por Zelenka el 24 May 2014 13:21, editado 2 veces en total

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Alberto Franchetti (1860-1942) He was born in Turin. From a noble family of substantial wealth, Baron Alberto Franchetti was lucky enough to be able to dedicate all his time to writing music instead of teaching composition or working other jobs like many composers of the past and present. Being independently wealthy, he had the unique chance to see his operas produced and performed under the best possible conditions. He even had the free time to pursue such hobbies as an interest in fast cars - in common with Puccini. Primarily an opera composer, Franchetti studied in Turin and Venice, then later in Germany with Rheinberger in Munich and Draeseke in Dresden. His earlier operas were acclaimed in their time, including Asrael (1888). On an eclectic libretto by Ferdinando Fontana (librettist of Puccini's Le Villi and Edgar), Asrael has a plot that seems to mix Boito's Mefistofele with Wagner's Lohengrin. Seeing the production of Asrael at La Scala in 1889, Verdi was so impressed that he recommended Franchetti to be the composer of the Genoa opera commission celebrating the 400th anniversary of the discovery of America. This led to Franchetti's finest work, Cristoforo Colombo, written on one of Luigi Illica's earliest librettos and premiered in Genoa in 1892.

Like Asrael, Cristoforo Colombo has massive epic scenes that show Franchetti at his best, for he was always most comfortable working with large-scale forces and huge masses of sound. Indeed, the influence of two other epic composers, Meyerbeer and Wagner, is particularly noticeable in Asrael, and even the libretto for Cristoforo Colombo was modeled on Meyerbeer's L'Africaine. Whatever the influences, however, Cristoforo Colombo was a masterpiece, demonstrating the contemporary Italian aesthetic of sinfonismo through the use of large symphonic interludes and complete integration of the soloists' voices into the orchestral texture. The orchestra, therefore, was the unifying body of each act through continuous musical discourse. This showed progress towards a new kind of Italian musical theater, and Franchetti was right there on the cutting edge. The Italian audience was excited by the sheer grandness of Act II (set aboard the Santa Maria), by the employment of novel staging techniques (a revolving backdrop, influenced by Bayreuth's Parsifal), and by the masterly use of the orchestra. Franchetti had reached his highest accomplishment as a music-dramatist, and the Franchetti-Illica team had reached the culmination of their collaboratory efforts.

Later works did less to show off Franchetti's talent, however. After turning down Illica's libretto Tosca (subsequently given to Puccini), Franchetti experienced his greatest popular success with Illica's Germania, premiered at La Scala in 1902 under Toscanini. Despite being a hit with the Italian public, this opera showed the composer's occasional difficulty with individual characterization. Germania also suffered from Franchetti's somewhat naive attempt to create local color through the use of German folk songs. It can be said, though, that if his melodic invention lacked individuality, it was always fluent and resourceful. Another work, La figlia di Iorio (1906), was a disastrous attempt to capture the essence of the Abruzzese pagan society of Gabriele D'Annunzio's play. Franchetti's orchestration evokes a gentle pastoral atmosphere throughout, but D'Annunzio's characters are, in ridiculous contrast, very powerful and even cruel. Sadly enough, Franchetti's postwar works like Giove a Pompei (1921) and Glauco (1922) showed an even more serious decline in musical style and overall dramatic vision. His reputation as a composer began to wane in Italy and abroad, and it was perhaps to get his mind off composition that he finally took the post of director of the Florence Conservatory from 1926 to 1928. It was the only official musical position he ever held. Franchetti composed little, if any, after that. His short-lived success around the turn of the century may have been over, but works like Asrael and Cristoforo Colombo were well-deserving of the praise they had received. In fact, for his earlier works, Franchetti still deserves notice and not oblivion.

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Cristoforo Colombo (1892), drama lírico en tres actos y un epílogo. Fragmento del acto primero.

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Última edición por Zelenka el 24 May 2014 13:25, editado 1 vez en total

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Discrepo con el reseñador; Germania me parece una buena ópera y, desde luego, la mejor de Franchetti, entre las que conozco.


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Philip Glass (*1937) He was born in Baltimore, Maryland. His youth was characterized by a number of remarkable successes. A precocious child, he advanced quickly as a scholar and student of the flute and entered the University of Chicago at the age of 14. After receiving a bachelor of arts in 1956, he entered the Juilliard School of Music in New York City in 1958 and pursued composition studies with William Bergsma and Vincent Persichetti. By 1965 Glass had composed over 100 works, 40 of which had been published. He later studied with Nadia Boulanger in Paris, and it was during this two-year period that he met and worked with sitar player Ravi Shankar, who introduced him to Indian music. He was intrigued by its sound and possibilities and attracted to Asian and Middle Eastern cultures. Eventually, he even converted to Buddhism. Glass later spoke of how greatly his 1966 visit to Tibet influenced his thinking, both musically and spiritually.

After returning to New York in 1967, Glass struggled financially and had to work as a cab driver and plumber for a time. Eventually, he established the Glass Ensemble in the early '70s. This group consisted of seven players and used keyboards, woodwind instruments, and amplification of vocals. Though it also struggled at the outset, it eventually became immensely popular. The new musical style that Glass was evolving was eventually dubbed “minimalism.” Glass himself never liked the term and preferred to speak of himself as a composer of “music with repetitive structures.” Much of his early work was based on the extended reiteration of brief, elegant melodic fragments that wove in and out of an aural tapestry. Or, to put it another way, it immersed a listener in a sort of sonic weather that twists, turns, surrounds, develops.

Glass' Einstein on the Beach was staged in 1976 and was his first large-scale triumph. By this time, too, his Ensemble was in greater demand, as were a good many of his other works. Since the 1980s, Glass' popularity has grown with the successes of his 1982 Company, for string quartet or string orchestra, the 1987 violin concerto, and the 1997 score, Kundun, written for the Martin Scorsese film. There have been other operas from Glass' pen, including The Fall of the House of Usher and Orphée. Among other works is the remarkable Monsters of Grace, for voices and instrumental ensemble, a mystical composition that uses light and other effects in performance. Glass has received many awards, among which have been the Chevalier de l'Ordre des Arts et des Lettres in 1995, from the French government. Glass continues to write music and must be regarded as among the most important composers of his time.

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Einstein on the Beach, ópera en cuatro actos (1976). Del acto segundo, Knee play.

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Satyagraha, ópera en tres actos (1980). Acto primero, escena primera, The Kuru Field of Justice.

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Akhnaten, ópera en tres actos (1983). Acto segundo, escena cuarta, Hymn.

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Última edición por Zelenka el 24 May 2014 13:32, editado 2 veces en total

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¿Tu hablando de Glass? Hay algo que no me cuadra :D


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En la web de Glass, en concreto aquí podéis escuchar algún fragmento más del Einstein. También alguna otra obra suya. Especialmente recomendable el concierto para violín. :wink:

Según qué obras Glass me resulta aburrido. Pero me dejó alucinado con O Corvo Branco. :D

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