Fecha actual 25 Sep 2018 23:52

Todos los horarios son UTC + 1 hora [ DST ]




Nuevo tema Responder al tema  [ 1089 mensajes ]  Ir a página Anterior  1 ... 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22 ... 73  Siguiente
Autor Mensaje
 Asunto:
NotaPublicado: 21 Dic 2007 2:44 
Desconectado
Figurante
Figurante

Registrado: 20 Jun 2007 15:27
Mensajes: 11
Ubicación: Valencia
Tambien soy nuevo y tambien estoy maravillado y agradecido por esta cadena. Enhorabuena a Zelenka y los demas colaboradores. Que siga muchos años y si es posible, que me pueda unir a la gloria. Lo que se aprende en este hilo!! Saludos a tod@s

Esteban Rodrigo.-


Arriba
 Perfil  
 
 Asunto:
NotaPublicado: 26 Dic 2007 0:21 
Desconectado
Div@
Div@
Avatar de Usuario

Registrado: 05 Oct 2005 20:42
Mensajes: 2595
Imagen

Johann Michael Haydn (1737–1806) He was born in Rohrau, Lower Austria on the domains of the Counts Harrach. As one of twelve children born to wheelwright (and later Bürgermeister) Mathias Haydn and his wife Anna Maria, née Koller, who had been a cook at the Harrack Castle. Most of their children died in infancy. The oldest surviving, Franz Josef was born in 1732. Michael, called Hanssmichl by his father, received his first musical training in Rohrau, and in nearby Hainburg, where he was a choirboy. In 1745 he followed in brother Josephs footsteps and became a chorister in St.Stephen's Cathedral, Vienna. The choir was led by Kapellmeister Georg von Reutter, with whom both of the boys had quite some trouble and often found themselves punished by. At St.Stephens he received rudimentary instruction in theory and practice of music. He studied violin and organ with Reutter. And equally important, he had the opportunity to hear and perform music of the leading composers of that time. He became skilled enough in playing the organ to act as deputy organist of St.Stephen's. He was a chorister until around 1752, but didn't leave St.Stephen's until sometime around 1757. He attended the Jesuit Seminary, studying history, geography and the classics and was well educated. In 1753-4 one of his fellow students was Johann Georg Albrechtsberger. He taught himself composition from Fux's 'Gradus ad Parnassum' and soon showed unusual promise. His first known work came in 1754. The brilliant Missa in honorem Sanctissimae Trinitatis, which by far outshines brother Josef's first works of the genre.

In 1760 he was appointed Kapellmeister to the Bishop of Grosswardein, Count Adam Patáchich. Grosswardein, then Southern Hungary, today Oradea in Northwestern Rumania. Here he apparently had to rely on supplemental earnings from his works to make a living, and he left in 1762. At some point during the next year he appeared in Salzburg, where he was to remain until his death. In 1763 he was appointed concertmaster and court composer to the archiepiscopal establishment, under Prince-Archbishop Siegmund, Count von Schrattenbach. He quickly rose to a position of prominence in the Salzburg Kapelle, surpassing by far the abilities of his older colleagues. Michaels relationship with the young Mozart (Wolfgang Amadeus), seems to have been very fine. Although Mozart occationally made some rude remarks about Michael in his letters, he was very impressed with Michael's music. There is little evidence of a teacher/pupil relationship, but Mozart often studied Michaels works and on several occations found direct inspiration in them. They coorporated on a work and on a couple of occations helped supplying works for each other. They maintained contact, even when Mozart left for Vienna. The relationship with Mozart senior (Leopold), was a little more tricky. Michael was a highly qualified competitor to the posts in Salzburgs music life. Leopold was generally both positive and supportive towards Michael, but from time to time, and when Wolfgang was in need for a position, Leopold could become equally negative and withdraw his support. This is not so surprising. Family comes first and Leopold always worked hard on behalf of his beloved children.

In 1781 he overtook the post of organist of the Cathedral in Salzburg, when young Mozart permanantly left for Vienna. At this point he already held the same post in the churches of the Holy Trinity and of St.Peter. These posts he took over from Anton Adlgasser in 1777. He was also teaching at the chapel boy's college. in 1787 he became violin instructor for the court (succeeding Leopold Mozart on his death). In December 1800 Salzburg was taken by the French and Michael had some of his property seized, including a months salary. To help him, Joseph sent him money and a gold watch. And Empress Maria Theresia commissioned a mass and later a Requiem. Around this time, he visits Joseph in Eisenstadt, where he was offered the position as second Kapellmeister. This he refused however, hoping that conditions would improve in Salzburg. They did, but not nearly as he had expected and in a letter to his brother dated February 1804, Michael clearly regrets having turned down the Prince's 'generous offer'. He was also offered a position in Florence, to run the music for the Grand Duke of Tuscany. His reputation as a composer grew far beyond the confines of Salzburg and Austria and in 1804 he became a member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Music. He remained close to Joseph all of his life, and was highly regarded by his brother, who felt that Michael's religious works were superior to his own

The Danish Michael Haydn Project

Der Traum, pantomima en dos actos (1767). Canzone Pastorale O Amaryllis, ich lebe vergnügt. Recitative y aria Quid fugitis insani?.

Imagen

Die Hochzeit auf der Alm, Ein dramatisches Schäfergedicht en dos actos (1768). Aria Gequältes Herz! Entdecke mir die Wahrheit deiner Pein.

Der Bassgeigner zu Wörgl, Lustspiel en un acto (1773-1775). Aria Wie? Was, ich soll heut' übernachten.

Imagen


Última edición por Zelenka el 24 May 2014 9:57, editado 1 vez en total

Arriba
 Perfil  
 
 Asunto:
NotaPublicado: 02 Ene 2008 0:01 
Desconectado
Div@
Div@
Avatar de Usuario

Registrado: 05 Oct 2005 20:42
Mensajes: 2595
Imagen

František Vaclav Míča (1694-1744) Nació en Třebíč, Chejia. Hijo del organista Mikuláš Ondřej Míča. De 1710 a 1711 estuvo en Viena en la corte del Conde Questenberg, excelente laudista y aficionado a la música, en calidad de paje y músico. Cabría suponer que durante esta época estudió con Caldara o con Conti dado los contactos que estos compositores mantenían con el Conde. A partir de 1722 trabaja como Kapellmesiter en Jaroměřice, donde Questenberg había introducido la ópera italiana, hasta 30 representaciones por año, y donde en algunas ocasiones el propio Míča actuaba como tenor.

L'origine di Jaromeriz in Moravia (1730) Dramma per musica en tres actos y dos intermezzi (el tercer acto está perdido). Aria Quest'alta impresa viver eterno, aria Sento, ne' son perche.

Imagen


Arriba
 Perfil  
 
 Asunto:
NotaPublicado: 07 Ene 2008 23:17 
Desconectado
Div@
Div@
Avatar de Usuario

Registrado: 05 Oct 2005 20:42
Mensajes: 2595
Imagen

Edward Benjamin Britten (1913-1976) He was born in Lowestoft in Suffolk, the son of a dentist and a talented amateur musician. He began composing prolifically as a child, and was educated at Old Buckenham Hall School in Suffolk, a small all-boys prep school, and Gresham's School, Holt. In 1927, he began private lessons with Frank Bridge. He also studied, less happily, at the Royal College of Music under John Ireland and with some input from Ralph Vaughan Williams. Although ultimately held back by his parents (at the suggestion of College staff), Britten had also intended to study with Alban Berg in Vienna. His first compositions to attract wide attention were the Sinfonietta (Op.1), A Hymn to the Virgin (1930) and a set of choral variations A Boy was Born, written in 1934 for the BBC Singers. The following year he met W. H. Auden with whom he collaborated on the song-cycle Our Hunting Fathers, radical both in politics and musical treatment, and other works. Of more lasting importance was his meeting in 1936 with the tenor Peter Pears, who was to become his musical collaborator and inspiration as well as his life partner.

In early 1939, the two of them followed Auden to America. There Britten composed Paul Bunyan, an operetta (to a libretto by Auden), as well as the first of many song cycles for Pears; the period was otherwise remarkable for a number of orchestral works, including Variations on a Theme of Frank Bridge (written in 1937 for string orchestra), the Violin Concerto, and Sinfonia da Requiem (for full orchestra). Britten and Pears returned to England in 1942, Britten completing the choral works Hymn to Saint Cecilia (his last collaboration with Auden) and A Ceremony of Carols during the long sea voyage. He had already begun work on his opera Peter Grimes based on the writings of Suffolk poet George Crabbe, and its premiere at Sadler's Wells in 1945 was his greatest success so far. However, Britten was encountering opposition from sectors of the English musical establishment and gradually withdrew from the London scene, founding the English Opera Group in 1947 and the Aldeburgh Festival the following year, partly (though not solely) to perform his own works.

Grimes marked the start of a series of English operas, of which Billy Budd (1951) and The Turn of the Screw (1954) were particularly admired. These operas share common themes, with that of the 'outsider' particularly prevalent. Most feature such a character, excluded or misunderstood by society; often this is the protagonist, such as Peter Grimes and Owen Wingrave in their eponymous operas. An increasingly important influence was the music of the East, an interest fostered by a tour with Pears in 1957, when Britten was much struck by the music of the Balinese gamelan and by Japanese Noh plays. The fruits of this tour include the ballet The Prince of the Pagodas (1957) and the series of semi-operatic Parables for Church Performance: Curlew River (1964), The Burning Fiery Furnace (1966) and The Prodigal Son (1968). The greatest success of Britten's career was, however, the musically more conventional War Requiem, written for the 1962 consecration of Coventry Cathedral.

Britten developed close friendships with Dmitri Shostakovich and Mstislav Rostropovich in the 1960s, composing his Cello Suites for the latter and conducting the first Western performance of the former's Fourteenth Symphony; Shostakovich dedicated the score to Britten and often spoke very highly of his music. Britten himself had previously dedicated The Prodigal Son (the third and last of the 'Church Parables') to Shostakovich. In the last decade or so of his life, Britten suffered from increasing ill-health and his late works became progressively more sparse in texture. They include the opera Death in Venice (1973), the Suite on English Folk Tunes A Time There Was (1974) and Third String Quartet (1975), which drew on material from Death in Venice, as well as the dramatic cantata Phaedra (1976), written for Janet Baker.

Wikipedia

Paul Bunyan, operetta en dos actos (1941, rev. 1974). First Ballad Interlude y The Christmas Party.

Imagen


Última edición por Zelenka el 24 May 2014 10:01, editado 1 vez en total

Arriba
 Perfil  
 
 Asunto:
NotaPublicado: 11 Ene 2008 14:19 
Desconectado
Refuerzo de coro
Refuerzo de coro
Avatar de Usuario

Registrado: 04 Ene 2008 15:24
Mensajes: 54
Ubicación: Ahi mismo...
pues a mi me da error.....
saludos ](*,)

_________________
En la música todos los sentimientos vuelven a su estado puro y el mundo no es sino música hecha realidad.

(autor: Arthur Schopenhauer)


Arriba
 Perfil  
 
 Asunto:
NotaPublicado: 14 Ene 2008 23:15 
Desconectado
Div@
Div@
Avatar de Usuario

Registrado: 05 Oct 2005 20:42
Mensajes: 2595
Imagen

Reynaldo Hahn (1874-1947) He was born in Caracas, Venezuela. Born the youngest of twelve children, Reynaldo's father Carlos was an affluent engineer, inventor, and businessman of German-Jewish extraction; his mother, née de Echenagucia, was a Venezuelan of Basque origin. The increasingly volatile political atmosphere in South America during the 1870s made it wise for his father to retire and leave Venezuela. Hahn was just three years old when his family moved to Paris, and there is little doubt about the enormous impact this move would make on the future composer. Although he showed interest in his native music of Caracas in his youth, France would "determine and define Hahn's musical identity in later life". The city and its cultural resources: the Paris Opéra, the Paris Opéra Ballet, the Opéra Comique, in addition to the nexus of artists and writers, must have been an ideal setting for the precocious Hahn. He entered the Paris Conservatoire in 1886. He studied harmony with Théodore Dubois, piano with Decombes and composition with Jules Massenet, Charles Gounod and Camille Saint-Saëns. Alfred Cortot and Maurice Ravel were fellow students. Massenet's influence is clear in one of Hahn's earliest, and most famous, songs, Si mes vers avaient des ailes; written when the composer was only 13, it is a charming setting of verses by Victor Hugo. The combined forces of Massenet's advocacy on his behalf (enough to have his cycle of songs on the poetry of Paul Verlaine, Chansons grises, published in 1893) and Hahn's own fine singing voice (enabling him to accompany himself in salons and concert halls) helped to establish his reputation in the city.

Early in his career, Hahn made the acquaintance of Sarah Bernhardt and Marcel Proust; Proust, especially, would instill in Hahn a deep appreciation and understanding of poetry, which had a profound effect on Hahn's approach to vocal composition. Hahn once wrote, The genuine beauty of singing consists in a perfect unison, an amalgam, a mysterious alloy of the singing and the speaking voice, or to put it better, the melody and the spoken word. Hahn found himself seduced by the poetry of Victor Hugo, Théophile Gautier, and Paul Verlaine; he put his efforts toward creating musical phrasing and rhythmic gestures that would allow the words to speak for themselves. Hahn believed that only form can give a piece a chance of lasting.... This perhaps explains his predilection for the older, repetitive formal structures evident in some of his songs, such as "L'automne, Le printemps, and Quand je fus pris au pavillion.

Hahn's first stage composition was incidental music for Daudet's L'obstacle in 1890; his first opera to reach the stage was the three-act L'île du rêve, performed in Paris at the Opéra-Comique in 1898; a more successful serious opera appeared in 1935, Le marchand de Venise, in three acts, with a libretto by Zamacoïs, after Shakespeare. Notably, with Le marchand de Venise, Hahn deliberately returned to the "old-fashioned" division between musical numbers and recitatives and returned the orchestra to a purely accompanimental role. Hahn's most important ballet, Le dieu bleu, was composed in 1912 for Diaghilev's company (to a scenario by Cocteau and Madrazo). By far, Hahn's most successful theater piece is his operetta Ciboulette; it premiered to instant acclaim in Paris in 1923, and has received innumerable performances since. As a conductor he specialised in Mozart, conducting the initial performances of the Salzburg Festival at the invitation of Lilli Lehmann. He found the earlier composer so fascinating, in fact, that he composed in 1925 a musical comedy on his life, Mozart, in which he included pastiches of Mozart's own music. He also served, in the 1920s and 1930s, as general manager of the Cannes Casino opera house. For many years he was the influential music critic of the leading Paris daily, Le Figaro. Forced to leave Paris in 1940 during the Nazi occupation, he returned at the end of the war in 1945 to fulfill his appointment as director of the Paris Opéra. Unfortunately, he died shortly afterwards without executing the reforms for which his supporters had hoped.

Answers

Ciboulette, opereta en tres actos y cuatro cuadros (1923). Comienzo.

Imagen


Última edición por Zelenka el 24 May 2014 10:05, editado 1 vez en total

Arriba
 Perfil  
 
 Asunto:
NotaPublicado: 15 Ene 2008 15:07 
Desconectado
Div@
Div@
Avatar de Usuario

Registrado: 31 Ene 2007 20:31
Mensajes: 1162
Ubicación: Venezia
gracias por lo de Haydn! :D
llevaba ya mucho tiempo sin entrar en el foro...esque con el lio de la mudanza... :roll:

le estoy cogiendo el gustillo a esto de descubrir nuevas cositas... :lol:

:wink:

_________________
Al lampo dell'armi quest'alma guerriera vendetta farà.


Arriba
 Perfil  
 
 Asunto:
NotaPublicado: 15 Ene 2008 19:16 
Desconectado
Div@
Div@
Avatar de Usuario

Registrado: 05 Oct 2005 20:42
Mensajes: 2595
tamiri escribió:
le estoy cogiendo el gustillo a esto de descubrir nuevas cositas... :lol:


Ya era hora :P


Arriba
 Perfil  
 
 Asunto:
NotaPublicado: 21 Ene 2008 23:36 
Desconectado
Div@
Div@
Avatar de Usuario

Registrado: 05 Oct 2005 20:42
Mensajes: 2595
Imagen

Hermann Gustav Goetz (1840-1876) He was born in Königsberg. Goetz, the son of a salesman, came into contact with music early in his life. However, he did not receive his first serious piano lesson until 1857 - although he already had begun to compose some years before. At the end of the 1850s, he began to study for a degree in mathematics, but broke this off after three terms to study at the Stern conservatory in Berlin, where he studied piano and composition with Hans von Bülow. In 1862 he successfully graduated from the conservatory. In the following year, Goetz was appointed as city organist of Winterthur in Switzerland thanks to the assistance of Carl Reinecke, where he taught the piano and began to make his name as a composer. In 1868 he married, and two years later moved to the village of Hottingen, today a suburb of Zurich, but remained employed in Winterthur until 1872. Between 1870 and 1874, he wrote reviews for a music magazine. In the last years of his life, Goetz had to withdraw from teaching and concert performance due to the increasing seriousness of his tuberculosis, from which he had suffered from the 1850s and from which he would eventually die.

Although Goetz showed active interest in the important artistic trends of his own time (on the one hand Liszt and Wagner, on the other Brahms), his own compositional style was more influenced by Mozart and Mendelssohn, and to a lesser degree by Schumann. Goetz's music is defined by lyricism and great clarity, and in general terms can be defined as quiet and introverted. Goetz almost completely avoided spectacular effects. Great mastery of compositional technique is characteristic of Goetz's style, which is particularly apparent in the connectedness of motifs and the technical depth of movements. For a long time, Goetz was almost forgotten, although Gustav Mahler performed a number of his works; only since the 1990s have his works been regarded once more as of importance. Goetz was no radical forger of new musical paths, but rather a composer in total control of his compositional technique, and whose works through their high standard give lie to the labelling of Goetz as a composer of the lower order.

Wikipedia

Der Widerspenstigen Zähmung, ópera en cuatro actos (1868-1873). Fragmento del acto primero.

Imagen


Última edición por Zelenka el 24 May 2014 10:07, editado 1 vez en total

Arriba
 Perfil  
 
 Asunto:
NotaPublicado: 22 Ene 2008 10:06 
Desconectado
Div@
Div@
Avatar de Usuario

Registrado: 30 Dic 2005 13:54
Mensajes: 12924
Ubicación: Madrid
¿No tendrá usted también Francesca da Rimini, Zelenka?

Sólo he conseguido escuchar la obertura.


Arriba
 Perfil  
 
 Asunto:
NotaPublicado: 22 Ene 2008 18:32 
Desconectado
Div@
Div@
Avatar de Usuario

Registrado: 05 Oct 2005 20:42
Mensajes: 2595
Desgraciadamente estoy igual que tu :?


Arriba
 Perfil  
 
 Asunto:
NotaPublicado: 23 Ene 2008 16:03 
Desconectado
Div@
Div@

Registrado: 24 Mar 2004 11:24
Mensajes: 8734
Ubicación: Gasteiz
Zelenka escribió:
Imagen

Hermann Gustav Goetz (1840-1876) He was born in Königsberg. Goetz, the son of a salesman, came into contact with music early in his life. However, he did not receive his first serious piano lesson until 1857 - although he already had begun to compose some years before. At the end of the 1850s, he began to study for a degree in mathematics, but broke this off after three terms to study at the Stern conservatory in Berlin, where he studied piano and composition with Hans von Bülow. In 1862 he successfully graduated from the conservatory. In the following year, Goetz was appointed as city organist of Winterthur in Switzerland thanks to the assistance of Carl Reinecke, where he taught the piano and began to make his name as a composer. In 1868 he married, and two years later moved to the village of Hottingen, today a suburb of Zurich, but remained employed in Winterthur until 1872. Between 1870 and 1874, he wrote reviews for a music magazine. In the last years of his life, Goetz had to withdraw from teaching and concert performance due to the increasing seriousness of his tuberculosis, from which he had suffered from the 1850s and from which he would eventually die.

Although Goetz showed active interest in the important artistic trends of his own time (on the one hand Liszt and Wagner, on the other Brahms), his own compositional style was more influenced by Mozart and Mendelssohn, and to a lesser degree by Schumann. Goetz's music is defined by lyricism and great clarity, and in general terms can be defined as quiet and introverted. Goetz almost completely avoided spectacular effects. Great mastery of compositional technique is characteristic of Goetz's style, which is particularly apparent in the connectedness of motifs and the technical depth of movements. For a long time, Goetz was almost forgotten, although Gustav Mahler performed a number of his works; only since the 1990s have his works been regarded once more as of importance. Goetz was no radical forger of new musical paths, but rather a composer in total control of his compositional technique, and whose works through their high standard give lie to the labelling of Goetz as a composer of the lower order.

Wikipedia

Der Widerspenstigen Zähmung (1868-73) Opera en cuatro actos. Fragmento del acto primero.

Imagen


¡¡Yo tengo esta ópera!! Cuando la compré en Londres (a menos de cinco libras, si no recuerdo mal) el vendedor casi me da las gracias porque la tenían en la tienda desde la desconolización de la India. le he oido un par de veces en esta misma versión y es muy recomendable.


Arriba
 Perfil  
 
 Asunto:
NotaPublicado: 23 Ene 2008 16:37 
Desconectado
Div@
Div@
Avatar de Usuario

Registrado: 05 Oct 2005 20:42
Mensajes: 2595
Todo Goetz es muy recomendable. En CPO está toda la música orquestal y la de cámara con piano. :wink:


Arriba
 Perfil  
 
 Asunto:
NotaPublicado: 23 Ene 2008 17:15 
Desconectado
Div@
Div@
Avatar de Usuario

Registrado: 30 Dic 2005 13:54
Mensajes: 12924
Ubicación: Madrid
Yo también la compré en Londres, pero a 18 Libras. Está visto que nunca me entero de las gangas...

Me uno a la recomendación, una ópera muy agradable de escuchar.


Arriba
 Perfil  
 
 Asunto:
NotaPublicado: 29 Ene 2008 19:48 
Desconectado
Div@
Div@
Avatar de Usuario

Registrado: 05 Oct 2005 20:42
Mensajes: 2595
Imagen

Giacomo Facco (1676-1753) Nacio en Marsango, provincia de Padua. No se conocen datos acerca de su formación musical. En 1705 se encontraba en Palermo (Sicilia) en calidad de maestro de capilla y virtuoso de violín del Virrey Don Carlo Filippo Antonio Spinola Colonna, Marqués de los Balbases, ahí estrenó El convite hecho por José, oratorio a 4 voces e instrumentos. En 1708 Facco acompaña al Virrey cuando este traslada su residencia a Messina. En esta ciudad estrena la obra titulada La Contienda entre la Piedad y la Incredulidad; y en 1710 presenta, en la plaza de la Catedral, la obra Augurio de Victorias, dedicada al Rey Felipe V.

En un informe de 1720, el Patriarca de las Indias, Cardenal D. Carlos de Borja de Centelles y Ponce de León, Arzobispo de Trebisonda, notificaba que Facco se encontraba con un sueldo relevante, en la Corte del Rey de España, después de haber rechazado igual solicitud recibida de la Corte Portuguesa, donde el Marqués de los Balbases se hallaba como Embajador de S.M. el Rey Felipe V. Ese mismo año, Facco fue nombrado Maestro de clavicordio del Príncipe de Asturias, el infante Luis, futuro Luis I. Sucesivamente fue Maestro del Infante y Príncipe de Asturias, futuro Rey Fernando VI y en 1731 fue nombrado Maestro de música del Infante Don Carlos, futuro Rey Carlos III.

Considerado entre los mejores compositores de música de su tiempo, el Ayuntamietno de Madrid le encargó, en 1720, la composición de un ópera sobre texto de José de Cañizares quien la derivó no solamente de la latina Amphitruo de Tito M. Plauto, sino del portugués Luiz de Camoens, y de los españoles Fernánd Pérez de Oliva y de Juan de Timoneda. La ópera que se titula Amor es todo Invención o Júpiter y Amphitrión, fue estrenada en el Coliseo del Buen Retiro y dedicada a SS.MM. para festejar, en 1721, el casamiento de su alumno, el Príncipe de Asturias, con Isabel de Orleans. Víctima de las intrigas de otros colegas sin escrúpulos, Facco fue lentamente desplazado de sus cargos hasta quedar, en las postrimerías de su vida, únicamente como violinista en la orquesta de la Capilla Real.

Uberto Zanolli

Amor es todo Invención o Júpiter y Amphitrión, ópera en dos jornadas (1721). Duo de la primera jornada, Al choque violento. Aria de la primera jornada, A ti dueño divino.

Imagen


Última edición por Zelenka el 24 May 2014 10:14, editado 1 vez en total

Arriba
 Perfil  
 
Mostrar mensajes previos:  Ordenar por  
Nuevo tema Responder al tema  [ 1089 mensajes ]  Ir a página Anterior  1 ... 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22 ... 73  Siguiente

Todos los horarios son UTC + 1 hora [ DST ]


¿Quién está conectado?

Usuarios navegando por este Foro: semyonkotko y 8 invitados


No puede abrir nuevos temas en este Foro
No puede responder a temas en este Foro
No puede editar sus mensajes en este Foro
No puede borrar sus mensajes en este Foro

   
     
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group
Traducción al español por Huan Manwë para phpbb-es.com